Advisor Information

Ann Fruhling

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Most older adults have expressed a desire to age in place. Advances in medicine and technology have helped improve the feasibility to fulfill this desire. Assistive and interactive technologies (AITs), which assist with at least one activity of daily living (ADL) or instrumental activity of daily living (IADL), may be key in supporting independent living, improving the user’s quality of life, and reducing caregiver burden. This study aimed to investigate the technology needs and preferences of older adults and how demographics, IADL/ADL function, and quality of life relate to these needs and preferences.

Older adults, mostly in Nebraska, were recruited to take an online survey with questions pertaining to demographics, technology use, caregiving, current and future IADL/ADL function, and quality of life. Survey questions were adapted from sections of the Behavioral Risk Factor and Surveillance System (BRFSS), Miller et al. (2018), and the 19-question Control, Autonomy, Self-Realization, and Pleasure (CASP-19) scale.

Of 66 older adults completing the survey, the average age was 69.3± 9.9, and the majority were female (77.3%), white (89.4%), and had at least some college education (98.5%). Older adults reported being generally optimistic about their quality of life and current and future IADL/ADL function. All older adults reported using at least some technology, most commonly for productivity and networking. These results suggest that high-functioning older adults integrate technology into their daily lives. Future work is needed to evaluate the technology needs and perceptions of older adults with more challenges.

Available for download on Saturday, February 05, 2022

Included in

Gerontology Commons

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Examining Assistive and Interactive Technology Needs of Older Adults

Most older adults have expressed a desire to age in place. Advances in medicine and technology have helped improve the feasibility to fulfill this desire. Assistive and interactive technologies (AITs), which assist with at least one activity of daily living (ADL) or instrumental activity of daily living (IADL), may be key in supporting independent living, improving the user’s quality of life, and reducing caregiver burden. This study aimed to investigate the technology needs and preferences of older adults and how demographics, IADL/ADL function, and quality of life relate to these needs and preferences.

Older adults, mostly in Nebraska, were recruited to take an online survey with questions pertaining to demographics, technology use, caregiving, current and future IADL/ADL function, and quality of life. Survey questions were adapted from sections of the Behavioral Risk Factor and Surveillance System (BRFSS), Miller et al. (2018), and the 19-question Control, Autonomy, Self-Realization, and Pleasure (CASP-19) scale.

Of 66 older adults completing the survey, the average age was 69.3± 9.9, and the majority were female (77.3%), white (89.4%), and had at least some college education (98.5%). Older adults reported being generally optimistic about their quality of life and current and future IADL/ADL function. All older adults reported using at least some technology, most commonly for productivity and networking. These results suggest that high-functioning older adults integrate technology into their daily lives. Future work is needed to evaluate the technology needs and perceptions of older adults with more challenges.