Advisor Information

Mithra Pirooz, Dr. Jonathon Bruce Santo

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

This presentation will discuss a study examining the relationship between social withdrawal and total number of friends on peer victimization, which is when a child or adolescent is outcast, harassed, or bullied by peers. This study took place in Barranquilla, Colombia and Montréal, Canada. 1375 children ranging from 6-15 years of age participated in this study. Social withdrawal, number of friends, and peer victimization was measured through peer nominations. A multiple regression analysis was performed and found that social withdrawal was a positive predictor of peer victimization, β=.41,t(1193)=15.69,p<.05, while a greater number of friends was a negative predictor for peer victimization, β=-.15,t(1193)=-5.78,p<.05. The findings indicate that positive social interaction and a network of friends lessened the likelihood of being victimized by peers. Future directions could look at parent/guardian relationships on peer victimization and effective intervention strategies to reduce victimization.

Comments

Meeting that day from 11am-12pm, possible future work conflicts may arise but I will kvitale@unomaha.edu contact if that were to occur.

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Adolescent Adjustment: How Social Withdrawal and Number of Friends Affect Peer Victimization

This presentation will discuss a study examining the relationship between social withdrawal and total number of friends on peer victimization, which is when a child or adolescent is outcast, harassed, or bullied by peers. This study took place in Barranquilla, Colombia and Montréal, Canada. 1375 children ranging from 6-15 years of age participated in this study. Social withdrawal, number of friends, and peer victimization was measured through peer nominations. A multiple regression analysis was performed and found that social withdrawal was a positive predictor of peer victimization, β=.41,t(1193)=15.69,p<.05, while a greater number of friends was a negative predictor for peer victimization, β=-.15,t(1193)=-5.78,p<.05. The findings indicate that positive social interaction and a network of friends lessened the likelihood of being victimized by peers. Future directions could look at parent/guardian relationships on peer victimization and effective intervention strategies to reduce victimization.