Presentation Title

Re-Examination of Filamentation Requirements of C. albicans in Log and Post Diauxic Phase

Presenter Information

Elias SmithFollow

Advisor Information

Jill Blankenship

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Candida albicans is a commensal fungus normally found within the human microbiome. Despite its normally neutral presence, C. albicans is an opportunistic pathogen when the host’s immune system and its neighboring microbiota are unable to keep it in check. Systemic infections by C. albicans in immunocompromised individuals are potentially fatal due to difficulty in clearance of the fungus with current medications. This pathogenicity in C. albicans is heavily reliant on its ability to filament and transition between yeast and hyphal states. Filamentation is known to require the absence of quorum sensing factors like farnesol and the presence of inducing conditions. However, a third factor may be required for filamentation. Our data suggests that there is a third trigger for filamentation, that cells must be in post-diauxic phase prior to induction in order to filament. Cells were assessed for filamentation at 3, 6, and 9 hour time points starting with either log phase or post-diauxic phase cells in inducing conditions. Cells grown in inducing conditions from log phase cells failed to grow as true hyphae in any inducing condition tested, although pseudohyphae were observed in some inducing conditions. Our study highlights how much we still have to learn about the process of filamentation in C. albicans and our findings have larger implications for current drug functionality.

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COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Re-Examination of Filamentation Requirements of C. albicans in Log and Post Diauxic Phase

Candida albicans is a commensal fungus normally found within the human microbiome. Despite its normally neutral presence, C. albicans is an opportunistic pathogen when the host’s immune system and its neighboring microbiota are unable to keep it in check. Systemic infections by C. albicans in immunocompromised individuals are potentially fatal due to difficulty in clearance of the fungus with current medications. This pathogenicity in C. albicans is heavily reliant on its ability to filament and transition between yeast and hyphal states. Filamentation is known to require the absence of quorum sensing factors like farnesol and the presence of inducing conditions. However, a third factor may be required for filamentation. Our data suggests that there is a third trigger for filamentation, that cells must be in post-diauxic phase prior to induction in order to filament. Cells were assessed for filamentation at 3, 6, and 9 hour time points starting with either log phase or post-diauxic phase cells in inducing conditions. Cells grown in inducing conditions from log phase cells failed to grow as true hyphae in any inducing condition tested, although pseudohyphae were observed in some inducing conditions. Our study highlights how much we still have to learn about the process of filamentation in C. albicans and our findings have larger implications for current drug functionality.