Presentation Title

The use of 3D printed models to improve the understanding of complex orthopedic trauma

Presenter Information

David SalazarFollow

Advisor Information

Jorge Zuniga

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

3D printing is a popular method of additive manufacturing that has a large potential impact within the field of medicine. One application that has been highlighted in the past is the ability to replicate complex anatomy for educational purposes. Orthopedic operations are amongst the most complex, due to the unique anatomy of structures such as the pelvic bone. The purpose of this study was to create 3D printed models of complex orthopedic trauma to improve education of how to perform the reconstruction for medical and residency students. 7 unique cases of knee, acetabulum, and pelvic operations were 3D printed using low-cost methods. Of the 14 students included in the study, half were instructed on how to perform the operation using only a traditional presentation, while the other half received the same presentation but also got the opportunity to interact with the 3D printed models. The differences between the two groups were compared using a standardized survey to investigate advantages in learning caused by implementing 3D printed educational models.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

The use of 3D printed models to improve the understanding of complex orthopedic trauma

3D printing is a popular method of additive manufacturing that has a large potential impact within the field of medicine. One application that has been highlighted in the past is the ability to replicate complex anatomy for educational purposes. Orthopedic operations are amongst the most complex, due to the unique anatomy of structures such as the pelvic bone. The purpose of this study was to create 3D printed models of complex orthopedic trauma to improve education of how to perform the reconstruction for medical and residency students. 7 unique cases of knee, acetabulum, and pelvic operations were 3D printed using low-cost methods. Of the 14 students included in the study, half were instructed on how to perform the operation using only a traditional presentation, while the other half received the same presentation but also got the opportunity to interact with the 3D printed models. The differences between the two groups were compared using a standardized survey to investigate advantages in learning caused by implementing 3D printed educational models.