Presentation Title

The Effect of Handrail Use on Knee Joint Kinetics When Negotiating Stairs

Author ORCID Identifier

0000-0003-4218-7398

Advisor Information

Dr. Brian Knarr

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Approximately 80% of US children and adults do not get adequate amounts of daily physical activity[1]. Meyer et al., (2010) demonstrated that taking the stairs at work can increase daily physical activity, and improve multiple health measures, amongst inactive adults[2]. The use of a handrail is common to improve self-efficacy of stair negotiation[3], but little research has been done to investigate how the use of a handrail effects the biomechanics of stair walking. The purpose of this study was to develop a critical understanding of the effect handrail use has on knee joint biomechanics during stair negotiation in healthy young adults. Five individuals (height:1.73+0.11 m, weight:65.11+10.34 kg, Age:25.2+5.72) participated in both stair ascent and stair descent walking trials involving three handrail conditions: 1) no support, 2) light support, and 3) self-selected handrail use. Force plate data were used to calculate sagittal plane knee joint moment during both stair ascent and stair descent. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance test was performed to determine differences between handrail conditions. No significant differences were found in peak knee extension moment (p=0.14) or peak knee flexion moment (p=0.43) during stair ascent. Similarly, no significant differences were found between conditions for the first (p=0.36) or second (p=0.60) knee extension moment peak during stair descent. However, this abstract only includes preliminary findings from a pilot sample and results should be interpreted cautiously. Future research is needed to determine the effect of handrail use on knee joint kinetics in other populations.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

The Effect of Handrail Use on Knee Joint Kinetics When Negotiating Stairs

Approximately 80% of US children and adults do not get adequate amounts of daily physical activity[1]. Meyer et al., (2010) demonstrated that taking the stairs at work can increase daily physical activity, and improve multiple health measures, amongst inactive adults[2]. The use of a handrail is common to improve self-efficacy of stair negotiation[3], but little research has been done to investigate how the use of a handrail effects the biomechanics of stair walking. The purpose of this study was to develop a critical understanding of the effect handrail use has on knee joint biomechanics during stair negotiation in healthy young adults. Five individuals (height:1.73+0.11 m, weight:65.11+10.34 kg, Age:25.2+5.72) participated in both stair ascent and stair descent walking trials involving three handrail conditions: 1) no support, 2) light support, and 3) self-selected handrail use. Force plate data were used to calculate sagittal plane knee joint moment during both stair ascent and stair descent. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance test was performed to determine differences between handrail conditions. No significant differences were found in peak knee extension moment (p=0.14) or peak knee flexion moment (p=0.43) during stair ascent. Similarly, no significant differences were found between conditions for the first (p=0.36) or second (p=0.60) knee extension moment peak during stair descent. However, this abstract only includes preliminary findings from a pilot sample and results should be interpreted cautiously. Future research is needed to determine the effect of handrail use on knee joint kinetics in other populations.