Presentation Title

Assessing the Adoption and Implementation of Budget Simulations at the Municipal Level

Presenter Information

Wei-Jie LiaoFollow

Advisor Information

Carol Ebdon

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

In the United States, citizen participation has been widely used in the public decision-making process for decades. In the public budgeting process, several citizen participation mechanisms are frequently implemented by governments, such as open records, public hearings/public meetings, focus groups, budget simulations, citizen budget advisory committees, and citizen surveys. Among the mechanisms, budget simulations are seldom mentioned in the existing literature. There is no systematic analysis of the adoption, implementation, and outcomes of budget simulations. However, in the practical world, budget simulations have become more and more popular at all levels of governments in recent years.

To bridge the research gap, I apply Ebdon and Franklin’s (2006) framework of citizen participation in the budgeting process to examine the adoption and implementation of budget simulations and focus on the following three questions: (1) What factors affect the adoption of budget simulations? (2) How do municipalities implement budget simulations? (3) What are some preliminary outcomes of budget simulations? This research examines the actual use of budget simulations at the local level, which may provide a clearer picture of budget simulations for municipalities that are considering including citizen participation in their budget-making process.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Assessing the Adoption and Implementation of Budget Simulations at the Municipal Level

In the United States, citizen participation has been widely used in the public decision-making process for decades. In the public budgeting process, several citizen participation mechanisms are frequently implemented by governments, such as open records, public hearings/public meetings, focus groups, budget simulations, citizen budget advisory committees, and citizen surveys. Among the mechanisms, budget simulations are seldom mentioned in the existing literature. There is no systematic analysis of the adoption, implementation, and outcomes of budget simulations. However, in the practical world, budget simulations have become more and more popular at all levels of governments in recent years.

To bridge the research gap, I apply Ebdon and Franklin’s (2006) framework of citizen participation in the budgeting process to examine the adoption and implementation of budget simulations and focus on the following three questions: (1) What factors affect the adoption of budget simulations? (2) How do municipalities implement budget simulations? (3) What are some preliminary outcomes of budget simulations? This research examines the actual use of budget simulations at the local level, which may provide a clearer picture of budget simulations for municipalities that are considering including citizen participation in their budget-making process.