Advisor Information

Brian Knarr

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Introduction: Research has shown that non-contact ACL injuries are very common for female athletes involved in level I/II sports, specifically soccer and volleyball players. Injury prevention programs have been developed but still remain largely generalized to meet the needs of all athletes. Different sports place unique demands on their athletes which may lead them to develop different risk factors for injury. In order to develop the most effective injury prevention across different sports, we must first understand differences in biomechanics related to ACL injury risk between athletes specializing in different sports. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to determine if athletes specializing in soccer and volleyball present different biomechanics related to ACL injury risk factors.

Methods: 18 healthy female D1 athletes from UNO, 14 soccer players and 4 volleyball players, participated in this study. During collections, they performed 3 drop vertical jump (DVJ) tests, a quadriceps/hamstrings ratio test, a cross-over hop test, and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) survey. Lower body kinematics were used to calculate valgus collapse values for each DVJ. Four 2-sample t-tests, two Mann-Whitney U tests, and corresponding effect sizes were used to compare the outcomes between sports.

Results & Discussion: No statistically significant differences were found between volleyball and soccer players for any of the 6 tests. The effect sizes were large for the right (0.8630) and left (0.8211) valgus collapse, and medium for the right (0.3834) and left (0.2469) H/Q. The results demonstrate that soccer players could potentially present with greater risk for valgus collapse and muscle imbalances than volleyball players. Additional sample size in volleyball players is warranted.

Comments

Kaitlyn Guhl is on the UNO Women's soccer team. She has a game in Denver the day of the fair. Lindsey Remski will present Kaitlyn's research at the fair.

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Risk Factor Assessment for ACL Injuries in D1 Soccer and Volleyball Athletes

Introduction: Research has shown that non-contact ACL injuries are very common for female athletes involved in level I/II sports, specifically soccer and volleyball players. Injury prevention programs have been developed but still remain largely generalized to meet the needs of all athletes. Different sports place unique demands on their athletes which may lead them to develop different risk factors for injury. In order to develop the most effective injury prevention across different sports, we must first understand differences in biomechanics related to ACL injury risk between athletes specializing in different sports. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to determine if athletes specializing in soccer and volleyball present different biomechanics related to ACL injury risk factors.

Methods: 18 healthy female D1 athletes from UNO, 14 soccer players and 4 volleyball players, participated in this study. During collections, they performed 3 drop vertical jump (DVJ) tests, a quadriceps/hamstrings ratio test, a cross-over hop test, and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) survey. Lower body kinematics were used to calculate valgus collapse values for each DVJ. Four 2-sample t-tests, two Mann-Whitney U tests, and corresponding effect sizes were used to compare the outcomes between sports.

Results & Discussion: No statistically significant differences were found between volleyball and soccer players for any of the 6 tests. The effect sizes were large for the right (0.8630) and left (0.8211) valgus collapse, and medium for the right (0.3834) and left (0.2469) H/Q. The results demonstrate that soccer players could potentially present with greater risk for valgus collapse and muscle imbalances than volleyball players. Additional sample size in volleyball players is warranted.