Presentation Title

Improving Mobility in Peripheral Artery Disease Using an Ankle Foot Orthosis: Effect of physical activity on the metabolic cost in patients with peripheral artery disease while walking with and without an Ankle Foot Orthosis

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized as the buildup of atherosclerotic plaques preventing adequate blood circulation. The narrowing of blood vessels diminishes the oxygen delivered to the active muscles, leading to claudication. An ankle foot orthosis (AFO) potentially reduces oxygen deficiency by substituting for the muscle force using the energy stored in the device. Overall metabolic oxygen consumption is a good indicator of how changes in biological muscle force impact overall energy cost of walking.

The magnitude of metabolic change with and without an AFO may be related to an individual’s physical activity (PA). High levels of PA have been associated with increased efficiency of oxygen transport throughout the body, which results in an improvement in oxygen extraction capability. We propose to investigate this relationship between PA and improvement in metabolic oxygen consumption during walking.

A total of 25 subjects with PAD will be recruited from a claudication clinic. Walking performance with and without wearing a carbon composite AFO will be measured. Measures of oxygen consumption will be taken during progressive treadmill trials for AFO and non-AFO conditions.

Subjects will be divided into active and inactive groups based on their average steps per day. Oxygen consumption and walking distance between the two groups will be compared between the AFO and non-AFO condition.

The outcomes of this study will highlight a relationship between PA levels and the improvements in oxygen consumption during walking in patients with PAD. We will also learn how that relationship changes while wearing an AFO.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Improving Mobility in Peripheral Artery Disease Using an Ankle Foot Orthosis: Effect of physical activity on the metabolic cost in patients with peripheral artery disease while walking with and without an Ankle Foot Orthosis

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized as the buildup of atherosclerotic plaques preventing adequate blood circulation. The narrowing of blood vessels diminishes the oxygen delivered to the active muscles, leading to claudication. An ankle foot orthosis (AFO) potentially reduces oxygen deficiency by substituting for the muscle force using the energy stored in the device. Overall metabolic oxygen consumption is a good indicator of how changes in biological muscle force impact overall energy cost of walking.

The magnitude of metabolic change with and without an AFO may be related to an individual’s physical activity (PA). High levels of PA have been associated with increased efficiency of oxygen transport throughout the body, which results in an improvement in oxygen extraction capability. We propose to investigate this relationship between PA and improvement in metabolic oxygen consumption during walking.

A total of 25 subjects with PAD will be recruited from a claudication clinic. Walking performance with and without wearing a carbon composite AFO will be measured. Measures of oxygen consumption will be taken during progressive treadmill trials for AFO and non-AFO conditions.

Subjects will be divided into active and inactive groups based on their average steps per day. Oxygen consumption and walking distance between the two groups will be compared between the AFO and non-AFO condition.

The outcomes of this study will highlight a relationship between PA levels and the improvements in oxygen consumption during walking in patients with PAD. We will also learn how that relationship changes while wearing an AFO.