Presentation Title

Pilot-testing methods for analyzing the effect of a prosthesis-simulating crutch on contralateral leg ground reaction force

Presenter Information

Siena SenatoreFollow

Advisor Information

Phillipe Malcolm

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

About one million adults in the US live with a lower limb amputation. Despite remarkable advances in research on passive and active prostheses, there are less expected side effects, such as increased pain and osteoarthritis in the intact limb. When designing assistive devices for amputees, prosthetists fit the prostheses without considering the footwear. Footwear parameters, such as cushioning, can affect ground reaction forces. As a preliminary step towards testing the effects of altering prosthesis and footwear in amputees, we pilot-tested the effect of a knee crutch on ground reaction force. Using the knee crutch helps us simulate walking with a prosthesis. A participant walked under four conditions, designed to evaluate the functionality of the knee crutch in addition to its effects on ground reaction force. Walking with the knee crutch drastically altered the ground reaction force. Additionally, wearing the knee crutch led to changes in the ground reaction force on the opposite leg. This suggests that optimizing prosthesis parameters could minimize intact leg loading for individuals who wear a prosthesis. Additionally, the knee crutch did not seem to change the peak value of the ground reaction force but it increased the loading rate toward the initial peak known as the impact peak. In future experiments, we will pilot-test different footwear parameters like pylon height and stiffness and analyze their effect on ground reaction force. Our overall goal is to create a computer algorithm designed to optimize shoe parameters to reduce intact knee loading in a minimal amount of time.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Pilot-testing methods for analyzing the effect of a prosthesis-simulating crutch on contralateral leg ground reaction force

About one million adults in the US live with a lower limb amputation. Despite remarkable advances in research on passive and active prostheses, there are less expected side effects, such as increased pain and osteoarthritis in the intact limb. When designing assistive devices for amputees, prosthetists fit the prostheses without considering the footwear. Footwear parameters, such as cushioning, can affect ground reaction forces. As a preliminary step towards testing the effects of altering prosthesis and footwear in amputees, we pilot-tested the effect of a knee crutch on ground reaction force. Using the knee crutch helps us simulate walking with a prosthesis. A participant walked under four conditions, designed to evaluate the functionality of the knee crutch in addition to its effects on ground reaction force. Walking with the knee crutch drastically altered the ground reaction force. Additionally, wearing the knee crutch led to changes in the ground reaction force on the opposite leg. This suggests that optimizing prosthesis parameters could minimize intact leg loading for individuals who wear a prosthesis. Additionally, the knee crutch did not seem to change the peak value of the ground reaction force but it increased the loading rate toward the initial peak known as the impact peak. In future experiments, we will pilot-test different footwear parameters like pylon height and stiffness and analyze their effect on ground reaction force. Our overall goal is to create a computer algorithm designed to optimize shoe parameters to reduce intact knee loading in a minimal amount of time.