Presentation Title

Spectral Specificity of the Neural Dynamics Serving Attentional Orienting

Advisor Information

Tony Wilson

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

29-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Orienting attention toward task-relevant stimuli with spatial and temporal cues is common in experimental settings to investigate the neural dynamics serving attentional orienting. Spatial cues indicate the location in space a stimulus will appear, while temporal cues are predictive of the timing of stimulus onset. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have examined the divergence of neural networks involved in discrepant attentional orienting methods (i.e., spatial versus temporal). However, the rhythmic neural activity underlying temporal and spatial orienting is largely unstudied. The study described herein utilized magnetoencephalography (MEG) and an adapted Posner cueing task to evaluate the oscillatory dynamics serving spatial and temporal orienting. We found spectral dissociation where alpha (10-16 Hz) activity was critical for spatial orienting and theta (3-6 Hz) oscillations were pertinent to temporal orienting. Specifically, we observed decreases in alpha activity during spatial orienting in key attention areas and increases in theta power in primary visual areas. These findings suggest the rhythmic neural activity supporting attentional orienting are spectrally specific such that spatial orienting is served by alpha oscillatory dynamics and theta activity is necessitated for temporal orienting and provide further insight into the neural dynamics underlying attention.

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COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 29th, 12:00 AM

Spectral Specificity of the Neural Dynamics Serving Attentional Orienting

Orienting attention toward task-relevant stimuli with spatial and temporal cues is common in experimental settings to investigate the neural dynamics serving attentional orienting. Spatial cues indicate the location in space a stimulus will appear, while temporal cues are predictive of the timing of stimulus onset. Previous functional neuroimaging studies have examined the divergence of neural networks involved in discrepant attentional orienting methods (i.e., spatial versus temporal). However, the rhythmic neural activity underlying temporal and spatial orienting is largely unstudied. The study described herein utilized magnetoencephalography (MEG) and an adapted Posner cueing task to evaluate the oscillatory dynamics serving spatial and temporal orienting. We found spectral dissociation where alpha (10-16 Hz) activity was critical for spatial orienting and theta (3-6 Hz) oscillations were pertinent to temporal orienting. Specifically, we observed decreases in alpha activity during spatial orienting in key attention areas and increases in theta power in primary visual areas. These findings suggest the rhythmic neural activity supporting attentional orienting are spectrally specific such that spatial orienting is served by alpha oscillatory dynamics and theta activity is necessitated for temporal orienting and provide further insight into the neural dynamics underlying attention.