Presentation Title

Dual-Task Prioritization During Overground Walking

Presenter Information

Matthew SpiekerFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Vivien Marmelat

Location

Zoom

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Our group has previously shown that during dual-task walking, stride-to-stride variations become more random in people with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and healthy older adults. We also found that participants with more random variations in dual-task walking compared to single-task walking did not perform well on the cognitive task during dual-task walking. This suggests that stride-to-stride randomness could indicate gait automaticity. This study aims to test this hypothesis by comparing dual-task walking with and without task-prioritization. We expect randomness to decrease when participants prioritize the cognitive task and increase when the locomotor task is prioritized.

60 PD and 60 healthy elderly (HE) will participate in baseline, 6 month, and 12 month collections. Collections consist of 2 visits in a single cognitive task (STC), and a single walking task (STW) are performed on the first visit and three dual-task walking conditions (no prioritization (DT), prioritization on walking (DTW), and prioritization on the cognitive task (DTC)) are completed on the second visit. All conditions except for the DT condition require the participant to listen to 10 minutes of an audiobook while monitoring the occurrence of two predetermined words. Gait variability is assessed using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and cognitive performance is measured from performance on the word monitoring task and answering questions about the audiobook plot. Preliminary results show DFA for both PD and HE increased during DTW and DTC compared to DT. Average PD DFA was higher during DTW than in DTC. Conversely, average HE DFA was lower during DTW than in DTC.

Our group haspreviously shown that during dual-task walking, stride-to-stride variations become more random in people withParkinson’s Disease(PD)and healthyolderadults. We also found thatparticipants with more random variationsin dual-task walking compared to single-task walking did not perform well on the cognitive taskduring dual-task walking. This suggests thatstride-to-stride randomnesscould indicategait automaticity.This studyaimsto test this hypothesis by comparing dual-task walking with and without task-prioritization. We expect randomnessto decrease when participantsprioritizethe cognitive taskand increase when the locomotor task is prioritized.60 PD and 60 healthy elderly (HE) willparticipate in baseline, 6 month, and 12 monthcollections. Collectionsconsist of 2 visitsina single cognitive task (STC), and a single walking task (STW)are performed on the first visit andthree dual-task walking conditions (no prioritization (DT), prioritization on walking (DTW), and prioritization on the cognitive task (DTC)) are completed on the second visit. All conditions except for the DT condition require the participant to listen to 10 minutes of anaudiobook while monitoring the occurrence of two predetermined words.Gait variability is assessed using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and cognitive performance is measured from performance on the word monitoring task and answering questions about the audiobook plot.Preliminary resultsshow DFA for both PD and HE increased during DTW and DTCcompared to DT. Average PD DFA was higher during DTW than in DTC. Conversely, average HE DFA was lower during DTW than in DTC.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Dual-Task Prioritization During Overground Walking

Zoom

Our group has previously shown that during dual-task walking, stride-to-stride variations become more random in people with Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and healthy older adults. We also found that participants with more random variations in dual-task walking compared to single-task walking did not perform well on the cognitive task during dual-task walking. This suggests that stride-to-stride randomness could indicate gait automaticity. This study aims to test this hypothesis by comparing dual-task walking with and without task-prioritization. We expect randomness to decrease when participants prioritize the cognitive task and increase when the locomotor task is prioritized.

60 PD and 60 healthy elderly (HE) will participate in baseline, 6 month, and 12 month collections. Collections consist of 2 visits in a single cognitive task (STC), and a single walking task (STW) are performed on the first visit and three dual-task walking conditions (no prioritization (DT), prioritization on walking (DTW), and prioritization on the cognitive task (DTC)) are completed on the second visit. All conditions except for the DT condition require the participant to listen to 10 minutes of an audiobook while monitoring the occurrence of two predetermined words. Gait variability is assessed using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and cognitive performance is measured from performance on the word monitoring task and answering questions about the audiobook plot. Preliminary results show DFA for both PD and HE increased during DTW and DTC compared to DT. Average PD DFA was higher during DTW than in DTC. Conversely, average HE DFA was lower during DTW than in DTC.

Our group haspreviously shown that during dual-task walking, stride-to-stride variations become more random in people withParkinson’s Disease(PD)and healthyolderadults. We also found thatparticipants with more random variationsin dual-task walking compared to single-task walking did not perform well on the cognitive taskduring dual-task walking. This suggests thatstride-to-stride randomnesscould indicategait automaticity.This studyaimsto test this hypothesis by comparing dual-task walking with and without task-prioritization. We expect randomnessto decrease when participantsprioritizethe cognitive taskand increase when the locomotor task is prioritized.60 PD and 60 healthy elderly (HE) willparticipate in baseline, 6 month, and 12 monthcollections. Collectionsconsist of 2 visitsina single cognitive task (STC), and a single walking task (STW)are performed on the first visit andthree dual-task walking conditions (no prioritization (DT), prioritization on walking (DTW), and prioritization on the cognitive task (DTC)) are completed on the second visit. All conditions except for the DT condition require the participant to listen to 10 minutes of anaudiobook while monitoring the occurrence of two predetermined words.Gait variability is assessed using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and cognitive performance is measured from performance on the word monitoring task and answering questions about the audiobook plot.Preliminary resultsshow DFA for both PD and HE increased during DTW and DTCcompared to DT. Average PD DFA was higher during DTW than in DTC. Conversely, average HE DFA was lower during DTW than in DTC.