Advisor Information

Julie Blaskewicz Boron

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Remaining community-dwelling is a goal for most aging adults; however, this may necessitate assistance from caregivers. To reduce burden and improve adult autonomy, recent technological advancements have provided various supports. These advancements may improve quality of life (QOL) while also enhancing psychological/physical well-being for adults and caregivers. To investigate relationships between technology, QOL, and caregiver burden, needs assessments with focus groups were utilized. Four older adult and two caregiver focus groups were conducted. Within older adult groups, participants were aged 64-83 years (M=73.1,SD=5.3); the sample was 50% female and 90% white. For caregiver groups, participants were aged 31-73 years (M=57.8,SD=13.2); the sample was 75% female and 100% white. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, focus groups were conducted via Zoom video-conferencing. Results revealed major themes of privacy, transportation, and interest in streamlined technology. Concerning AITs, privacy was repeatedly discussed; participants were either 1) apathetic, noting an absence of privacy or 2) hypervigilant about data loss, citing privacy concerns as major barriers to utilizing technologies. Transportation, specifically self-driving cars, emerged as a focus for future technologies; participants speculated that transportation improvements could reduce care dependency and improve autonomy/QOL. Generally, participants noted that a major obstacle to technology utilization was complexity and expressed interest in simpler devices. This study indicates the varied interest in technology while exposing barriers to use. Additionally, this methodology reveals the usefulness of Zoom for accessing vulnerable populations, although specific limitations exist. Overall, this study may inform future technological developments aimed at reducing barriers for older adults and caregivers.

Available for download on Saturday, February 04, 2023

COinS
 
Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Assistive and Interactive Technology Use, Comfort, and Interest in Caregiver and Older Adult Populations

Remaining community-dwelling is a goal for most aging adults; however, this may necessitate assistance from caregivers. To reduce burden and improve adult autonomy, recent technological advancements have provided various supports. These advancements may improve quality of life (QOL) while also enhancing psychological/physical well-being for adults and caregivers. To investigate relationships between technology, QOL, and caregiver burden, needs assessments with focus groups were utilized. Four older adult and two caregiver focus groups were conducted. Within older adult groups, participants were aged 64-83 years (M=73.1,SD=5.3); the sample was 50% female and 90% white. For caregiver groups, participants were aged 31-73 years (M=57.8,SD=13.2); the sample was 75% female and 100% white. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, focus groups were conducted via Zoom video-conferencing. Results revealed major themes of privacy, transportation, and interest in streamlined technology. Concerning AITs, privacy was repeatedly discussed; participants were either 1) apathetic, noting an absence of privacy or 2) hypervigilant about data loss, citing privacy concerns as major barriers to utilizing technologies. Transportation, specifically self-driving cars, emerged as a focus for future technologies; participants speculated that transportation improvements could reduce care dependency and improve autonomy/QOL. Generally, participants noted that a major obstacle to technology utilization was complexity and expressed interest in simpler devices. This study indicates the varied interest in technology while exposing barriers to use. Additionally, this methodology reveals the usefulness of Zoom for accessing vulnerable populations, although specific limitations exist. Overall, this study may inform future technological developments aimed at reducing barriers for older adults and caregivers.