Presentation Title

Examination of Dynamic Stability during Various Slips on Turns

Advisor Information

Nathaniel Hunt

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Up to 45% of the steps we take each day act to change our walking direction, which increases the risk of a slip due to elevated ground friction requirements. Despite this fact, little is known about the destabilizing effects of slips on turns. A common measure used to quantify the impact of balance disturbances is the margin of stability (MoS), but this measure has not been applied to slips on turns. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the influence of various turning slips on MoS. Eighteen young adults performed 12 slip trials while walking along curved paths. Each trial used a unique combination of slip onset phase (early, mid, or late stance), turn radius (1.0 m or 2.0 m), and slipped foot relative to the turn (inside or outside). Kinematics collected via motion capture were used to calculate whole body center of mass positions and velocities, while plantar pressure data obtained from Pedar-X insoles were used the derive center of pressure locations throughout each trial. The MoS is then taken as the distance between the center of mass motion state and the center of pressure. We expect a significant negative correlation between slip onset phase and MoS deviation, and that inside foot slips and the 1.0 m turn will cause greater MoS deviations than outside foot slips and the 2.0 m turn, respectively. Our results will provide critical insight into the whole body effects of a broad range of turning slips.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

Examination of Dynamic Stability during Various Slips on Turns

Up to 45% of the steps we take each day act to change our walking direction, which increases the risk of a slip due to elevated ground friction requirements. Despite this fact, little is known about the destabilizing effects of slips on turns. A common measure used to quantify the impact of balance disturbances is the margin of stability (MoS), but this measure has not been applied to slips on turns. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the influence of various turning slips on MoS. Eighteen young adults performed 12 slip trials while walking along curved paths. Each trial used a unique combination of slip onset phase (early, mid, or late stance), turn radius (1.0 m or 2.0 m), and slipped foot relative to the turn (inside or outside). Kinematics collected via motion capture were used to calculate whole body center of mass positions and velocities, while plantar pressure data obtained from Pedar-X insoles were used the derive center of pressure locations throughout each trial. The MoS is then taken as the distance between the center of mass motion state and the center of pressure. We expect a significant negative correlation between slip onset phase and MoS deviation, and that inside foot slips and the 1.0 m turn will cause greater MoS deviations than outside foot slips and the 2.0 m turn, respectively. Our results will provide critical insight into the whole body effects of a broad range of turning slips.