Presentation Title

BRAIN ACTIVATION DURING SINGLE AND DUAL TASK WALKING IN PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE

Advisor Information

Vivien Marmelat

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

End Date

26-3-2021 12:00 AM

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disease that affects the dopamine-producing neurons on the brain, resulting in tremors, limb rigidity, and gait and balance problems.1 The present study evaluated these symptoms under the constraints of dual-task walking procedures. By introducing the second task while walking, key attentional resources are directed away from walking towards the second task, increasing gait variability and the risk for falls, particularly in those with PD.2 An indicator of this attentional shift is visible via neuroimaging, where the prefrontal cortex shows increased activation during tasks requiring attention. The present study used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to monitor prefrontal activation during the task procedures in PD patients and healthy older adult controls. Over the course of two visits, participants were introduced to both the single and dual tasks that involved walking and cognitive listening. During the dual-tasks, we also provided instruction for prioritization of one task over another to observe the shift in prefrontal activity during the task. Present analyses show trends we expected to see, including more prefrontal activity during walking tasks compared to healthy older adults, which we are observing in the walking single-task and the cognitive-emphasis dual-task. However, some of the other walking tasks, no-prioritization and walking-prioritization dual-tasks in particular, are showing less prefrontal activity than we anticipate for PD patients compared to controls. Understanding the interaction between attentional prefrontal activity and gait variability, particularly in those with PD, can be extremely beneficial, especially when protecting these populations from fall risks.

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 26th, 12:00 AM

BRAIN ACTIVATION DURING SINGLE AND DUAL TASK WALKING IN PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON’S DISEASE

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disease that affects the dopamine-producing neurons on the brain, resulting in tremors, limb rigidity, and gait and balance problems.1 The present study evaluated these symptoms under the constraints of dual-task walking procedures. By introducing the second task while walking, key attentional resources are directed away from walking towards the second task, increasing gait variability and the risk for falls, particularly in those with PD.2 An indicator of this attentional shift is visible via neuroimaging, where the prefrontal cortex shows increased activation during tasks requiring attention. The present study used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to monitor prefrontal activation during the task procedures in PD patients and healthy older adult controls. Over the course of two visits, participants were introduced to both the single and dual tasks that involved walking and cognitive listening. During the dual-tasks, we also provided instruction for prioritization of one task over another to observe the shift in prefrontal activity during the task. Present analyses show trends we expected to see, including more prefrontal activity during walking tasks compared to healthy older adults, which we are observing in the walking single-task and the cognitive-emphasis dual-task. However, some of the other walking tasks, no-prioritization and walking-prioritization dual-tasks in particular, are showing less prefrontal activity than we anticipate for PD patients compared to controls. Understanding the interaction between attentional prefrontal activity and gait variability, particularly in those with PD, can be extremely beneficial, especially when protecting these populations from fall risks.