Presentation Title

Can I Remain True to Myself at Work? An Experimental Study of Psychologically Safe versus Unsafe Workplaces on LGBTQ+ and Heterosexual Perceptions of Authenticity, Belongingness, Vigilance, and Resiliency

Presenter Information

Matthew SwansonFollow

Advisor Information

Carey Ryan

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #206 - G

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 10:15 AM

Abstract

Researchers and managers have begun to consider ways to increase employee authenticity as greater authenticity has been linked to better well-being and mental health, lower stress, and fewer negative life events at work. Empirical work has also suggested that perceptions of authenticity are shaped by the characteristics of the work environment. Indeed, authenticity can conflict with workplace values and norms. Further, the role of identity, such as sexual orientation, is less clear in shaping authentic self-expression at work and how environmental factors, such as psychological safety, differentially impact self-expression at work. I propose a mixed-method experiment in which perceived psychological safety of the workplace is experimentally manipulated and subsequent judgments of authenticity, resiliency, vigilance, well-being, and belongingness are measured. Further, support resources such as religiosity and social support are expected to magnify these judgments. This research is the first, to my knowledge, to experimentally manipulate perceived psychological safety. Participants were heterosexual (n = 308) and LGBTQ (n = 287) workers who were recruited through Prolific Academic and were assigned to either a psychologically safe or unsafe condition. Using a narrative identity primer, participants were asked to describe in detail an experience at their current job that was either “healthy” or “unhealthy” with a focus on how the participant felt and the significance of the event to the participant. Measurement equivalence and the proposed model will be assessed using exploratory structural equation modeling and multigroup comparisons (ESEM).

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Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:15 AM

Can I Remain True to Myself at Work? An Experimental Study of Psychologically Safe versus Unsafe Workplaces on LGBTQ+ and Heterosexual Perceptions of Authenticity, Belongingness, Vigilance, and Resiliency

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #206 - G

Researchers and managers have begun to consider ways to increase employee authenticity as greater authenticity has been linked to better well-being and mental health, lower stress, and fewer negative life events at work. Empirical work has also suggested that perceptions of authenticity are shaped by the characteristics of the work environment. Indeed, authenticity can conflict with workplace values and norms. Further, the role of identity, such as sexual orientation, is less clear in shaping authentic self-expression at work and how environmental factors, such as psychological safety, differentially impact self-expression at work. I propose a mixed-method experiment in which perceived psychological safety of the workplace is experimentally manipulated and subsequent judgments of authenticity, resiliency, vigilance, well-being, and belongingness are measured. Further, support resources such as religiosity and social support are expected to magnify these judgments. This research is the first, to my knowledge, to experimentally manipulate perceived psychological safety. Participants were heterosexual (n = 308) and LGBTQ (n = 287) workers who were recruited through Prolific Academic and were assigned to either a psychologically safe or unsafe condition. Using a narrative identity primer, participants were asked to describe in detail an experience at their current job that was either “healthy” or “unhealthy” with a focus on how the participant felt and the significance of the event to the participant. Measurement equivalence and the proposed model will be assessed using exploratory structural equation modeling and multigroup comparisons (ESEM).