Presentation Title

Detection of Novel Repeat Regions within the Toxoplasma gondii Genome for Clinical Diagnostic

Presenter Information

Braydon DreherFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Paul H. Davis

Location

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - U

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 12:00 PM

Abstract

Sensitive, specific, and efficient diagnostics aid in the accurate detection of infectious diseases, which can be vital to ensure patients receive appropriate treatment. The current diagnostic methods of Toxoplasma gondii include serological testing and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), which have comparable accuracy. Currently, Rep529, a 200 to 300-fold repeated region, is used to detect T. gondii by quantitative PCR, but as a diagnostic marker, there is variability in the sensitivity against different strains. A novel PCR diagnostic marker that is more sensitive than the current clinical diagnostic of Rep529 would enhance detection of lower parasite amounts in the patient and be more accurate against strains that diverge from known isolates. Enhanced specificity to Toxoplasma gondii would ensure a lack of detection of the host and other human pathogens. Such developments would permit enhanced detection of the parasite, becoming a viable option for improving patient outcomes. Using a novel bioinformatics workflow, three novel regions of the T. gondii genome were identified and investigated to detect the pathogen at a more specific and sensitive threshold than Rep529. Now, in vitro laboratory techniques are showing, quantitatively, that all three sequences are more robust than the current state of the art.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:00 PM

Detection of Novel Repeat Regions within the Toxoplasma gondii Genome for Clinical Diagnostic

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - U

Sensitive, specific, and efficient diagnostics aid in the accurate detection of infectious diseases, which can be vital to ensure patients receive appropriate treatment. The current diagnostic methods of Toxoplasma gondii include serological testing and polymerase chain reactions (PCR), which have comparable accuracy. Currently, Rep529, a 200 to 300-fold repeated region, is used to detect T. gondii by quantitative PCR, but as a diagnostic marker, there is variability in the sensitivity against different strains. A novel PCR diagnostic marker that is more sensitive than the current clinical diagnostic of Rep529 would enhance detection of lower parasite amounts in the patient and be more accurate against strains that diverge from known isolates. Enhanced specificity to Toxoplasma gondii would ensure a lack of detection of the host and other human pathogens. Such developments would permit enhanced detection of the parasite, becoming a viable option for improving patient outcomes. Using a novel bioinformatics workflow, three novel regions of the T. gondii genome were identified and investigated to detect the pathogen at a more specific and sensitive threshold than Rep529. Now, in vitro laboratory techniques are showing, quantitatively, that all three sequences are more robust than the current state of the art.