Presentation Title

3D Printed Anatomical Models Improve Student Comprehension of Complex Anatomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Presenter Information

David SalazarFollow

Advisor Information

Jorge Zuniga

Location

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 10:15 AM

Abstract

3D printing has had a number of different applications in the medical field, with one of the most recent being the development of anatomic models. These representations of human structures such as bones and organs can be used to help educate students who are learning about those unique anatomical structures. Despite the potential for this technology to help improve anatomy comprehension, the assessments used to observe the effectiveness these models have at improving anatomical education is lacking. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis on the various applications of 3D printed models used for anatomical education. Based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, 3 databases (Cochrane, Web of Science, and PubMed) were searched using specific search terms and inclusion and exclusion criteria for articles that involved 3D printed anatomical models for student education. From the initial search, 120 potential articles of interest were identified. A total of 14 articles were used for the qualitative review and 7 were used for the meta-analysis. The results of the study found that students who used the 3D printed model as a part of their educational approach performed significantly better than students who did not on objective assessments (p

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:15 AM

3D Printed Anatomical Models Improve Student Comprehension of Complex Anatomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - G

3D printing has had a number of different applications in the medical field, with one of the most recent being the development of anatomic models. These representations of human structures such as bones and organs can be used to help educate students who are learning about those unique anatomical structures. Despite the potential for this technology to help improve anatomy comprehension, the assessments used to observe the effectiveness these models have at improving anatomical education is lacking. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis on the various applications of 3D printed models used for anatomical education. Based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, 3 databases (Cochrane, Web of Science, and PubMed) were searched using specific search terms and inclusion and exclusion criteria for articles that involved 3D printed anatomical models for student education. From the initial search, 120 potential articles of interest were identified. A total of 14 articles were used for the qualitative review and 7 were used for the meta-analysis. The results of the study found that students who used the 3D printed model as a part of their educational approach performed significantly better than students who did not on objective assessments (p