Presentation Title

Mindfulness as a Moderator on General Stress’s Relationships with Student Engagement and Burnout

Presenter Information

Rae MoralesFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Lisa Scherer

Location

MBSC Dodge Room 302B - U

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 12:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 1:45 PM

Abstract

Mindfulness and its’ protective qualities against adversity have become a prevalent topic in the mental health field. The current study builds off this subject as it aims to better understand working college students and the moderating role of mindfulness. More specifically, how mindfulness interacts with the relationships between stress level with student engagement and burnout. These variables were selected as both low student engagement and burnout have been known to have detrimental impacts on student achievement and well-being. Researchers aimed this study towards working college students as managing multiple demands can increase the risk of experiencing these negative outcomes. This study aspires to aid working college students in finding efficient coping strategies to avoid negative outcomes such as low student engagement and burnout. Researchers hypothesized that stress level would be negatively correlated to student engagement, and mindfulness would act as a buffer on this relationship. The second hypothesis tested in this study was that stress level would be positively related to burnout, which also would be buffered by mindfulness. To analyze the results, Hayes Process Marco was used to execute a moderated regression analysis. As a result, there was not a significant moderating effect of mindfulness on the association between stress level and student engagement. Despite this, there was a significant moderating effect of mindfulness on the relationship between stress level and burnout. Taking these findings into consideration it is recommended that further research expands on this matter to develop incite on the protective factor mindfulness can provide.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:30 PM Mar 4th, 1:45 PM

Mindfulness as a Moderator on General Stress’s Relationships with Student Engagement and Burnout

MBSC Dodge Room 302B - U

Mindfulness and its’ protective qualities against adversity have become a prevalent topic in the mental health field. The current study builds off this subject as it aims to better understand working college students and the moderating role of mindfulness. More specifically, how mindfulness interacts with the relationships between stress level with student engagement and burnout. These variables were selected as both low student engagement and burnout have been known to have detrimental impacts on student achievement and well-being. Researchers aimed this study towards working college students as managing multiple demands can increase the risk of experiencing these negative outcomes. This study aspires to aid working college students in finding efficient coping strategies to avoid negative outcomes such as low student engagement and burnout. Researchers hypothesized that stress level would be negatively correlated to student engagement, and mindfulness would act as a buffer on this relationship. The second hypothesis tested in this study was that stress level would be positively related to burnout, which also would be buffered by mindfulness. To analyze the results, Hayes Process Marco was used to execute a moderated regression analysis. As a result, there was not a significant moderating effect of mindfulness on the association between stress level and student engagement. Despite this, there was a significant moderating effect of mindfulness on the relationship between stress level and burnout. Taking these findings into consideration it is recommended that further research expands on this matter to develop incite on the protective factor mindfulness can provide.