Presentation Title

Examining Local Governments' Use of Budget Simulations

Presenter Information

Wei-Jie LiaoFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Carol Ebdon

Location

MBSC Omaha Room 304 - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 12:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 1:45 PM

Abstract

Citizen participation has been frequently used in the budgeting process since the 1980s. During the COVID-19 pandemic and post-pandemic, many governments may face not only limited resources but also increasing needs and decreasing revenues. One citizen participation mechanism, budget simulations, may have the potential to help governments deal with these problems. Budget simulations present citizens with real budget numbers and ask them to make trade-offs and balance the budget, so government officials can understand citizens’ preferences, prioritize public projects accordingly, and make good use of limited resources. However, there is little empirical research on budget simulations.

In 2006, Ebdon and Franklin developed a framework of citizen participation in the budgeting process to understand the elements and variables related to citizen participation. This study applies the Ebdon and Franklin framework and conducts 30 interviews with local budget officials in municipalities that have used budget simulations to understand the factors that affect the adoption of budget simulations, the process design and implementation of budget simulations, and the preliminary outcomes of budget simulations. The findings of this study can provide useful recommendations for practitioners interested in enhancing citizen participation, as well as contributing to theory-building in this area.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:30 PM Mar 4th, 1:45 PM

Examining Local Governments' Use of Budget Simulations

MBSC Omaha Room 304 - G

Citizen participation has been frequently used in the budgeting process since the 1980s. During the COVID-19 pandemic and post-pandemic, many governments may face not only limited resources but also increasing needs and decreasing revenues. One citizen participation mechanism, budget simulations, may have the potential to help governments deal with these problems. Budget simulations present citizens with real budget numbers and ask them to make trade-offs and balance the budget, so government officials can understand citizens’ preferences, prioritize public projects accordingly, and make good use of limited resources. However, there is little empirical research on budget simulations.

In 2006, Ebdon and Franklin developed a framework of citizen participation in the budgeting process to understand the elements and variables related to citizen participation. This study applies the Ebdon and Franklin framework and conducts 30 interviews with local budget officials in municipalities that have used budget simulations to understand the factors that affect the adoption of budget simulations, the process design and implementation of budget simulations, and the preliminary outcomes of budget simulations. The findings of this study can provide useful recommendations for practitioners interested in enhancing citizen participation, as well as contributing to theory-building in this area.