Presentation Title

Ankle-foot orthoses prevent ankle excessive range of motion in patients with peripheral artery disease before and after 3-month intervention

Presenter Information

Liz StaudacherFollow

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

MBSC Dodge Room 302B - U

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 12:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 1:45 PM

Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition caused by atherosclerosis of arteries in the extremities, resulting in pain with walking that requires rest to resolve. Gait is also impacted, as patients with PAD tend to demonstrate increased plantar flexion on heel strike known as “foot drop”. This irregular gait pattern requires additional effort to maintain stability which leads to increased energy expenditure and accelerates onset of fatigue. Ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) may be a viable treatment option to prolong the distance patients can walk before the onset of pain. Seventeen patients with PAD (Age (72.6±7.3 years), height (172.4±7.7 cm), body mass (88.8±18.4 kg) participated. During evaluation, participants were asked to walk with and without an AFO overground while gait was recorded with motion analysis cameras to measure plantar/dorsi flexion angles. The subjects were asked to wear an AFO for three months and then return for the second visit. Results were analyzed using a 2×2 repeated-measure-ANOVA with before/after three-month intervention (intervention) and walking with/without AFO (condition) as within subject factors. Results showed walking without the AFO led to increase in ankle range of motion (drop foot) in patients with PAD. Three-months intervention still showed progression of “foot drop” when walking without the AFO. Overall, there were some benefits to wearing the AFOs, but more research is needed to determine the overall efficacy of using AFOs to improve walking in patients with PAD.

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Mar 4th, 12:30 PM Mar 4th, 1:45 PM

Ankle-foot orthoses prevent ankle excessive range of motion in patients with peripheral artery disease before and after 3-month intervention

MBSC Dodge Room 302B - U

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a condition caused by atherosclerosis of arteries in the extremities, resulting in pain with walking that requires rest to resolve. Gait is also impacted, as patients with PAD tend to demonstrate increased plantar flexion on heel strike known as “foot drop”. This irregular gait pattern requires additional effort to maintain stability which leads to increased energy expenditure and accelerates onset of fatigue. Ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) may be a viable treatment option to prolong the distance patients can walk before the onset of pain. Seventeen patients with PAD (Age (72.6±7.3 years), height (172.4±7.7 cm), body mass (88.8±18.4 kg) participated. During evaluation, participants were asked to walk with and without an AFO overground while gait was recorded with motion analysis cameras to measure plantar/dorsi flexion angles. The subjects were asked to wear an AFO for three months and then return for the second visit. Results were analyzed using a 2×2 repeated-measure-ANOVA with before/after three-month intervention (intervention) and walking with/without AFO (condition) as within subject factors. Results showed walking without the AFO led to increase in ankle range of motion (drop foot) in patients with PAD. Three-months intervention still showed progression of “foot drop” when walking without the AFO. Overall, there were some benefits to wearing the AFOs, but more research is needed to determine the overall efficacy of using AFOs to improve walking in patients with PAD.