Presentation Title

Evaluation of a Baseball Pitching Program and Its Impact on Pitching Performance Biomechanics

Presenter Information

Tyler HamerFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Brian A. Knarr

Location

MBSC Gallery Room 308 - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 10:15 AM

Abstract

A pitcher's maximum throwing velocity is the culmination of their kinematics, kinetics, and relative timing of segmental coordination. Coaches seek to improve pitching mechanics, but little is known about how biomechanics change over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a pitching performance program on improving pitching biomechanics associated with increased throwing velocity. Nine Division I collegiate baseball pitchers were recruited for this study. Pitchers threw from a force-plate instrumented pitching mound while 14 motion capture cameras collected pitching motion data. A member of the research team met with each pitcher to discuss a custom report generated from the biomechanical evaluation. Overall, 41% of key pitching biomechanics improved while 52% decreased. Knee Flexion, Kinematic Sequencing, and timing of peak Hip-Shoulder Separation improved the most from the initial to most recent evaluation. These improvements were found within key variables pertaining to lower extremity biomechanics, movements addressed primarily due to their role in segmental coordination. This suggests improvements may be more easily made at the start of the kinetic chain.

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Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:15 AM

Evaluation of a Baseball Pitching Program and Its Impact on Pitching Performance Biomechanics

MBSC Gallery Room 308 - G

A pitcher's maximum throwing velocity is the culmination of their kinematics, kinetics, and relative timing of segmental coordination. Coaches seek to improve pitching mechanics, but little is known about how biomechanics change over time. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a pitching performance program on improving pitching biomechanics associated with increased throwing velocity. Nine Division I collegiate baseball pitchers were recruited for this study. Pitchers threw from a force-plate instrumented pitching mound while 14 motion capture cameras collected pitching motion data. A member of the research team met with each pitcher to discuss a custom report generated from the biomechanical evaluation. Overall, 41% of key pitching biomechanics improved while 52% decreased. Knee Flexion, Kinematic Sequencing, and timing of peak Hip-Shoulder Separation improved the most from the initial to most recent evaluation. These improvements were found within key variables pertaining to lower extremity biomechanics, movements addressed primarily due to their role in segmental coordination. This suggests improvements may be more easily made at the start of the kinetic chain.