Presentation Title

Metabolic Rate Increases When Synchronizing Steps to Non-structured Visual Cues

Advisor Information

Dr. Aaron Likens

Location

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 12:00 PM

Abstract

Walking exhibits natural variation over several gait cycle repetitions demonstrating long-range correlations (LRCs) over time (i.e., pink noise). Those natural patterns are associated with healthy, optimal, adaptative movement, and their deterioration is associated with diseases; consistent with the Optimal Movement Variability Hypothesis (OMVH). To restore healthy variations, previous studies have suggested synchronizing steps with variable cues exhibiting LRCs. However, the influence of such cues on walking metabolic cost remains unclear. This study investigated the effect of synchronizing steps to various visual cues on metabolic cost. Participants walked four 12-minute trials wearing footswitches on both heels while the COSMED K5 recorded metabolic rate. Participants completed a self-paced trial to determine mean and standard deviation to scale visual cues for the 3 remaining trials. Participants were instructed to synchronize their right heel with a signal displayed on augmented reality glasses during 3 visual conditions: pink noise, invariant (traditional metronome), and white noise cueing. The order of conditions was randomized. Strides were analyzed using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis to compute the scaling exponent α, a measure of statistical persistence. Linear mixed-effect models were used to examine noise and α on walking metabolic cost. The analysis showed that pink noise produced the smallest elevation when compared to the other conditions. These findings suggested that synchronizing steps to Pink noise reduces metabolic cost compared to invariant and white noise visual cues. These results support the OMVH, demonstrating that healthy movement exhibits long-range correlation overtime and that optimal forms of movement variability promote more efficient locomotion.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:00 PM

Metabolic Rate Increases When Synchronizing Steps to Non-structured Visual Cues

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - G

Walking exhibits natural variation over several gait cycle repetitions demonstrating long-range correlations (LRCs) over time (i.e., pink noise). Those natural patterns are associated with healthy, optimal, adaptative movement, and their deterioration is associated with diseases; consistent with the Optimal Movement Variability Hypothesis (OMVH). To restore healthy variations, previous studies have suggested synchronizing steps with variable cues exhibiting LRCs. However, the influence of such cues on walking metabolic cost remains unclear. This study investigated the effect of synchronizing steps to various visual cues on metabolic cost. Participants walked four 12-minute trials wearing footswitches on both heels while the COSMED K5 recorded metabolic rate. Participants completed a self-paced trial to determine mean and standard deviation to scale visual cues for the 3 remaining trials. Participants were instructed to synchronize their right heel with a signal displayed on augmented reality glasses during 3 visual conditions: pink noise, invariant (traditional metronome), and white noise cueing. The order of conditions was randomized. Strides were analyzed using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis to compute the scaling exponent α, a measure of statistical persistence. Linear mixed-effect models were used to examine noise and α on walking metabolic cost. The analysis showed that pink noise produced the smallest elevation when compared to the other conditions. These findings suggested that synchronizing steps to Pink noise reduces metabolic cost compared to invariant and white noise visual cues. These results support the OMVH, demonstrating that healthy movement exhibits long-range correlation overtime and that optimal forms of movement variability promote more efficient locomotion.