Presentation Title

TREADMILL HANDRAIL USE CAN IMPROVE GAIT STABILITY IN POST-STROKE PERSONS

Advisor Information

Brian A. Knarr

Location

MBSC Omaha Room 304 - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 12:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 1:45 PM

Abstract

Following the occurrence of stroke, a major goal of rehabilitation is to restore independent ambulation at an economical level. Previous research has shown that the inability to control mechanical gait stability or attain balance in stroke survivors limits their ability to attain gait economy and assistive devices (like handrails and cane) are able to alter walking outcomes that ensure balance control, prevent falls, and improve gait characteristics. Despite this evidence, limited information exists to define how handrail use in treadmill walking impacts mechanical gait stability in stroke survivors. Therefore, this study investigated how three handrail use conditions [No handrail use (NHR), Light handrail use (LHR – less than 5% body weight), Self-selected handrail use (SSHR)] impacts gait stability in stroke survivors; the participants used their unaffected hand to hold the handrail, and a projector screen indicated when the handrail use was more than 5% body weight at the LHR condition. Using the Margin of stability (MOS) variable as a primary predictor of gait stability, we hypothesized that there will be increased MOS at the weak leg of the participants during the self-selected handrail use conditions. Our results showed that the participants used more handrail support at the SSHR condition compared with the LHR condition, and we also observed that the medio-lateral MOS of the weak leg was significantly greatest at the SSHR condition. Our findings inform treadmill handrail use in stroke survivors, with the indication that increased handrail support could increase the mechanical gait stability of their weak or affected legs.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:30 PM Mar 4th, 1:45 PM

TREADMILL HANDRAIL USE CAN IMPROVE GAIT STABILITY IN POST-STROKE PERSONS

MBSC Omaha Room 304 - G

Following the occurrence of stroke, a major goal of rehabilitation is to restore independent ambulation at an economical level. Previous research has shown that the inability to control mechanical gait stability or attain balance in stroke survivors limits their ability to attain gait economy and assistive devices (like handrails and cane) are able to alter walking outcomes that ensure balance control, prevent falls, and improve gait characteristics. Despite this evidence, limited information exists to define how handrail use in treadmill walking impacts mechanical gait stability in stroke survivors. Therefore, this study investigated how three handrail use conditions [No handrail use (NHR), Light handrail use (LHR – less than 5% body weight), Self-selected handrail use (SSHR)] impacts gait stability in stroke survivors; the participants used their unaffected hand to hold the handrail, and a projector screen indicated when the handrail use was more than 5% body weight at the LHR condition. Using the Margin of stability (MOS) variable as a primary predictor of gait stability, we hypothesized that there will be increased MOS at the weak leg of the participants during the self-selected handrail use conditions. Our results showed that the participants used more handrail support at the SSHR condition compared with the LHR condition, and we also observed that the medio-lateral MOS of the weak leg was significantly greatest at the SSHR condition. Our findings inform treadmill handrail use in stroke survivors, with the indication that increased handrail support could increase the mechanical gait stability of their weak or affected legs.