Presentation Title

Irregular Metronomes Alter Bimanual Coordination Dynamics

Author ORCID Identifier

0000-0003-3255-7252

Advisor Information

Aaron Likens

Location

MBSC Omaha Room 304 - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 10:45 AM

End Date

3-2022 12:00 PM

Abstract

Coordination is the mastery of the redundant degrees of freedom of the body. The principles of coordination have been described by two theoretical frameworks, the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) model and fractal geometry. There is, however, no satisfactory union of these approaches. The aim of this work was to bring together these theoretical perspectives. Participants performed bimanual wrist rotations with an initial inphase or antiphase pattern to an auditory metronome. The metronome was structured to exhibit either an invariant stimulus or a variability embedded stimulus. Variability embedded stimuli consisted of three noise types: pink, white, and brown. Mean relative phase was computed from wrist rotation time series as the dependent measure of coordination. Results suggest that entrainment to a metronome of pink noise variability elicits a phase transition sooner than other types of metronomes, indicating that subjects adapt to a stable attractor faster under this condition.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 1st, 12:00 PM

Irregular Metronomes Alter Bimanual Coordination Dynamics

MBSC Omaha Room 304 - G

Coordination is the mastery of the redundant degrees of freedom of the body. The principles of coordination have been described by two theoretical frameworks, the Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) model and fractal geometry. There is, however, no satisfactory union of these approaches. The aim of this work was to bring together these theoretical perspectives. Participants performed bimanual wrist rotations with an initial inphase or antiphase pattern to an auditory metronome. The metronome was structured to exhibit either an invariant stimulus or a variability embedded stimulus. Variability embedded stimuli consisted of three noise types: pink, white, and brown. Mean relative phase was computed from wrist rotation time series as the dependent measure of coordination. Results suggest that entrainment to a metronome of pink noise variability elicits a phase transition sooner than other types of metronomes, indicating that subjects adapt to a stable attractor faster under this condition.