Presentation Title

The Effect of External Focus Cues on Lower Back Pain During the Golf Swing

Presenter Information

Garrett EgglestonFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Brian Knarr

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #903 - G

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 10:15 AM

Abstract

Between 25-50% of individuals who play golf have reported back pain [2,4], and it often is the result of poor swing mechanics or physical limitations. The way we swing can have adverse effects on injury risk and performance metrics. By using a lead leg heel raise, the player will increase the rotational freedom of the lower body, while optimizing the X-factor at the top of the swing. Internal and external cues will be used to aid in producing a motion that reduces the amount of loading being placed on the spine.

Participants will warm-up and baseline data will be collected. After, they hit golf shots while following the varied attentional focus cues (external vs. internal) and stance orientations (heel raise vs. planted). After each trial, they will be asked to rate their ability to remember the cue and multiple variables such as spinal torsion, X-factor rotation, and shot distance will be considered.

There is relatively no difference between the baseline and conditions when looking at the average carry distance, X-factor, and lower back moment max. However, in the external heel raise group there is a slight increase in carry distance in the iron trials and decrease in the driver trials. There is also a moderate increase in carry distance in the internal heel raise group during the driver trials. There was a relatively small decrease in X-factor in the external heel raise group. There was little change in the lower back moment when comparing the conditions and baselines.

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Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:15 AM

The Effect of External Focus Cues on Lower Back Pain During the Golf Swing

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #903 - G

Between 25-50% of individuals who play golf have reported back pain [2,4], and it often is the result of poor swing mechanics or physical limitations. The way we swing can have adverse effects on injury risk and performance metrics. By using a lead leg heel raise, the player will increase the rotational freedom of the lower body, while optimizing the X-factor at the top of the swing. Internal and external cues will be used to aid in producing a motion that reduces the amount of loading being placed on the spine.

Participants will warm-up and baseline data will be collected. After, they hit golf shots while following the varied attentional focus cues (external vs. internal) and stance orientations (heel raise vs. planted). After each trial, they will be asked to rate their ability to remember the cue and multiple variables such as spinal torsion, X-factor rotation, and shot distance will be considered.

There is relatively no difference between the baseline and conditions when looking at the average carry distance, X-factor, and lower back moment max. However, in the external heel raise group there is a slight increase in carry distance in the iron trials and decrease in the driver trials. There is also a moderate increase in carry distance in the internal heel raise group during the driver trials. There was a relatively small decrease in X-factor in the external heel raise group. There was little change in the lower back moment when comparing the conditions and baselines.