Presentation Title

Autonomic Nervous System Reactivity and Traits Associated with Antisocial Behavior

Advisor Information

Todd Armstrong

Location

MBSC Dodge Room 302B - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 2:00 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 3:15 PM

Abstract

The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of different methodologies on the association between autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and traits. We examined this with three distinct approaches: (1) focusing on variation of trait measures (e.g., Levenson-Self Report Psychopathy Scale (LSRP), Inventory of Callous-Unemotional traits (ICU), and the Sensation Seeking Scale Form V (SSS-V); (2) randomly assigning participants into one of two ANS stress tasks (i.e., countdown-task or social-evaluative stressor); and (3) evaluating the sample composition (i.e., sex differences). The current study’s sample consists of 200 University students. The participants were randomly assigned into one of two stress conditions (i.e., countdown-task or social-evaluative stressor) – with 50 males and 50 females included in each condition. Heart rate and skin conductance were measured within an anticipatory and response phase of each stress condition. This presentation will discuss preliminary results specific to variation in the strength of associations across trait measures, stressors, and sex. Identifying ANS measures associated with personality traits is a critical step to understanding the etiology of antisocial behaviors. The current study contributes to both theoretical understanding of traits associated with antisocial behavior and methodological considerations to inducing ANS reactivity.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 2:00 PM Mar 4th, 3:15 PM

Autonomic Nervous System Reactivity and Traits Associated with Antisocial Behavior

MBSC Dodge Room 302B - G

The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of different methodologies on the association between autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and traits. We examined this with three distinct approaches: (1) focusing on variation of trait measures (e.g., Levenson-Self Report Psychopathy Scale (LSRP), Inventory of Callous-Unemotional traits (ICU), and the Sensation Seeking Scale Form V (SSS-V); (2) randomly assigning participants into one of two ANS stress tasks (i.e., countdown-task or social-evaluative stressor); and (3) evaluating the sample composition (i.e., sex differences). The current study’s sample consists of 200 University students. The participants were randomly assigned into one of two stress conditions (i.e., countdown-task or social-evaluative stressor) – with 50 males and 50 females included in each condition. Heart rate and skin conductance were measured within an anticipatory and response phase of each stress condition. This presentation will discuss preliminary results specific to variation in the strength of associations across trait measures, stressors, and sex. Identifying ANS measures associated with personality traits is a critical step to understanding the etiology of antisocial behaviors. The current study contributes to both theoretical understanding of traits associated with antisocial behavior and methodological considerations to inducing ANS reactivity.