Presentation Title

Increasing walking speed in individuals post-stroke using real-time overground visual biofeedback

Advisor Information

Brian Knarr

Location

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 12:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 1:45 PM

Abstract

Stroke is a leading cause of long-term adult disability. Treadmill-based rehabilitation protocols have shown that real-time visual biofeedback can be used to improve walking mechanics. However, these treadmill-based studies require complex equipment typically limited to research laboratories, making their widespread clinical translation difficult. A recent study found that visual biofeedback during overground walking induces an increase in walking speed in individuals post-stroke, demonstrating the potential use of visual feedback in overground walking. Hip extension angle is a key biomechanical variable that can be easily measured outside the laboratory using low-cost equipment, and has also been related to walking speed. Therefore, the objective of this research project is to determine the short-term response to hip extension visual biofeedback in individuals post-stroke during unconstrained overground walking. We hypothesize that paretic peak hip extension angle and walking speed will increase after short overground gait training bouts with visual biofeedback compared to walking without feedback. For this research project, we had individuals post-stroke complete a training with our hip extension angle visual biofeedback device. We found that individuals post-stroke were able to increase their hip extension angle and walking speed after six minutes of walking with the device, as well as six minute of walking without the feedback. Therefore, some increase may be due to walking continuously for six minutes, but further increases were seen with the feedback. Biofeedback-induced increases in walking speed could enhance community ambulation, improve independence in activities of daily living, and increase quality of life of stroke survivors.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:30 PM Mar 4th, 1:45 PM

Increasing walking speed in individuals post-stroke using real-time overground visual biofeedback

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - G

Stroke is a leading cause of long-term adult disability. Treadmill-based rehabilitation protocols have shown that real-time visual biofeedback can be used to improve walking mechanics. However, these treadmill-based studies require complex equipment typically limited to research laboratories, making their widespread clinical translation difficult. A recent study found that visual biofeedback during overground walking induces an increase in walking speed in individuals post-stroke, demonstrating the potential use of visual feedback in overground walking. Hip extension angle is a key biomechanical variable that can be easily measured outside the laboratory using low-cost equipment, and has also been related to walking speed. Therefore, the objective of this research project is to determine the short-term response to hip extension visual biofeedback in individuals post-stroke during unconstrained overground walking. We hypothesize that paretic peak hip extension angle and walking speed will increase after short overground gait training bouts with visual biofeedback compared to walking without feedback. For this research project, we had individuals post-stroke complete a training with our hip extension angle visual biofeedback device. We found that individuals post-stroke were able to increase their hip extension angle and walking speed after six minutes of walking with the device, as well as six minute of walking without the feedback. Therefore, some increase may be due to walking continuously for six minutes, but further increases were seen with the feedback. Biofeedback-induced increases in walking speed could enhance community ambulation, improve independence in activities of daily living, and increase quality of life of stroke survivors.