Presentation Title

Frontline Workers’ Perceptions of Organizational Justice and Its Impact on Personal Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Presenter Information

Karla Ponce-MeridaFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Troy Romero

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #601 - U

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 10:15 AM

Abstract

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021), frontline essential workers are individuals who are at highest risk of exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus from work. These unprecedented times have shown that the personal well-being of frontline workers may have been impacted due to the increase of exposure to the virus. The purpose of this study is to see if perceptions of organizational justice are crucial for maintaining the personal well-being of frontline workers during a pandemic. This research project used a modified version of Gastón’s (2014) Likert-like scales pertaining to procedural justice, distributive justice, and personal well-being in terms of general mental health and self-esteem. A 2x2 within-subjects design (perceptions of organizational justice x frontline worker status, with personal well-being as the dependent variable) was implemented for the purpose of this study. Results found a main effect between organizational justice and frontline worker status and a significant positive correlation between organizational justice and personal well-being. In addition, there was an interaction between frontline worker status and organizational justice on personal well-being, suggesting that organizational justice matters to the personal well-being of employees, especially frontline workers.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:15 AM

Frontline Workers’ Perceptions of Organizational Justice and Its Impact on Personal Well-Being During the COVID-19 Pandemic

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #601 - U

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2021), frontline essential workers are individuals who are at highest risk of exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus from work. These unprecedented times have shown that the personal well-being of frontline workers may have been impacted due to the increase of exposure to the virus. The purpose of this study is to see if perceptions of organizational justice are crucial for maintaining the personal well-being of frontline workers during a pandemic. This research project used a modified version of Gastón’s (2014) Likert-like scales pertaining to procedural justice, distributive justice, and personal well-being in terms of general mental health and self-esteem. A 2x2 within-subjects design (perceptions of organizational justice x frontline worker status, with personal well-being as the dependent variable) was implemented for the purpose of this study. Results found a main effect between organizational justice and frontline worker status and a significant positive correlation between organizational justice and personal well-being. In addition, there was an interaction between frontline worker status and organizational justice on personal well-being, suggesting that organizational justice matters to the personal well-being of employees, especially frontline workers.