Presentation Title

The Relationship between Self-Reported Disability and Neurocognitive Hop Performance in Patients with Chronic Ankle Instability

Presenter Information

Ji Yeon ChoiFollow

Advisor Information

Adam Rosen

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #701 - G

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 12:00 PM

Abstract

Introduction: A Choice-reaction hop test (CRHT) is a functional performance test with an additional neurocognitive component designed to resemble more closely agility and immediate reaction time that is required for athletes in continuous unexpected dynamic movements. Investigating a relationship between self-reported disability and neurocognitive hop performance with CAI will enable clinicians to develop a better criterion to allow patients to return to functional activity safely. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) and CRHT. Methods: Six participants (4 males, 2 Females; age = 23.5±2.9 years old; height=178.1±8.7 cm; mass=77.3.0±14.1kg), who are physically active (>90 minutes of physical activity/week) participated in this study. Participants were asked to complete the CAIT and three Choice-reaction hop test (CRHT) trials with 10 repetitions on each limb. For the CRHT, participants were asked to hop on the mat indicated by flashing light in front of the screen as fast as they can. To investigate the relationship between the self-reported disability and neurocognitive hop performance, Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated. Results: There was very large correlation between the CAIT (CAIT, 21.7±2.8) and the average CRHT trial (20.4±4.0, r= −0.95, p=0.008) and a large correlation with the fastest time trial of the CRHT (20.0±3.4, r = −0.77, p=0.066). These results demonstrate that there is a strong indirect relationship between self-reported disability and neurocognitive hop performance. Conclusion: CAI patients with worse self-reported disability concurrently demonstrated worse performance during the CRHT, which reflects poorer neurocognitive hop performance.

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Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:00 PM

The Relationship between Self-Reported Disability and Neurocognitive Hop Performance in Patients with Chronic Ankle Instability

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #701 - G

Introduction: A Choice-reaction hop test (CRHT) is a functional performance test with an additional neurocognitive component designed to resemble more closely agility and immediate reaction time that is required for athletes in continuous unexpected dynamic movements. Investigating a relationship between self-reported disability and neurocognitive hop performance with CAI will enable clinicians to develop a better criterion to allow patients to return to functional activity safely. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between the Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool (CAIT) and CRHT. Methods: Six participants (4 males, 2 Females; age = 23.5±2.9 years old; height=178.1±8.7 cm; mass=77.3.0±14.1kg), who are physically active (>90 minutes of physical activity/week) participated in this study. Participants were asked to complete the CAIT and three Choice-reaction hop test (CRHT) trials with 10 repetitions on each limb. For the CRHT, participants were asked to hop on the mat indicated by flashing light in front of the screen as fast as they can. To investigate the relationship between the self-reported disability and neurocognitive hop performance, Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated. Results: There was very large correlation between the CAIT (CAIT, 21.7±2.8) and the average CRHT trial (20.4±4.0, r= −0.95, p=0.008) and a large correlation with the fastest time trial of the CRHT (20.0±3.4, r = −0.77, p=0.066). These results demonstrate that there is a strong indirect relationship between self-reported disability and neurocognitive hop performance. Conclusion: CAI patients with worse self-reported disability concurrently demonstrated worse performance during the CRHT, which reflects poorer neurocognitive hop performance.