Presentation Title

Perceived Barriers and Facilitators of Childcare Providers Own Physical Activity: A Qualitative Study

Presenter Information

Priyanka ChaudharyFollow

Advisor Information

Danae Dinkel

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #207 - G

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 12:00 PM

Abstract

Background: Childcare providers' perspectives of physical activity are important because they serve as role models to the children in their care by helping to form children's behaviors and attitudes surrounding physical activity. However, childcare providers' work demands and often low wages have been associated with high rates of work-related stress, depression, chronic physical health conditions, overweight and obesity, increased turnover, and sick leave. Furthermore, despite the critical role of childcare providers in encouraging physical activity, only a few studies have focused on the barriers and facilitators that childcare providers face regarding their own physical activity.

Objective: The purpose of the study is to explore the perceived barriers, facilitators of childcare providers' own physical activity.

Methods: A qualitative case study as utilized using semi-structured interviews guided by the Theoretical Domain Framework. A purposive sample of 24 childcare providers from both childcare centers and family childcare homes from the Midwest participated in interviews via Zoom or telephone. Data were analyzed using a directed content analysis approach.

Results: Themes regarding perceived barriers included: 1) limited knowledge of physical activity recommendation/ guidelines, 2) lack of time due to the priority of work, 3) health issues such as fatigue and knee/back pain, 4) unfavorable weather, (e.g., too cold/hot), 5) expense of physical activity programs, and 6) safety concern around the trail. Interestingly, it was noted that weekends led to reduced physical activity as the participants wanted to rest and relax. Perceived health benefits include 1) management of weight and diabetes, 2) improved mental health, and 3) better sleep. Additionally, most participants perceived facilitators included: 1) their physical activity skills, 2) motivation/ self-esteem, 3) a safe environment, and 4) more time. Several unique facilitators were found due to the COVID-19 pandemic positively impacting participants' physical activity level such as peer support (daughter, pet, and co-workers).

Most of the participants reported promoting physical activity among the children they serve.

Conclusion: Childcare providers face complex, multifaceted, and interrelated barriers to physical activity. To overcome these barriers, interventions that teach strategies for overcoming barriers and prioritizing physical activity amidst childcare demands are warranted.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:00 PM

Perceived Barriers and Facilitators of Childcare Providers Own Physical Activity: A Qualitative Study

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #207 - G

Background: Childcare providers' perspectives of physical activity are important because they serve as role models to the children in their care by helping to form children's behaviors and attitudes surrounding physical activity. However, childcare providers' work demands and often low wages have been associated with high rates of work-related stress, depression, chronic physical health conditions, overweight and obesity, increased turnover, and sick leave. Furthermore, despite the critical role of childcare providers in encouraging physical activity, only a few studies have focused on the barriers and facilitators that childcare providers face regarding their own physical activity.

Objective: The purpose of the study is to explore the perceived barriers, facilitators of childcare providers' own physical activity.

Methods: A qualitative case study as utilized using semi-structured interviews guided by the Theoretical Domain Framework. A purposive sample of 24 childcare providers from both childcare centers and family childcare homes from the Midwest participated in interviews via Zoom or telephone. Data were analyzed using a directed content analysis approach.

Results: Themes regarding perceived barriers included: 1) limited knowledge of physical activity recommendation/ guidelines, 2) lack of time due to the priority of work, 3) health issues such as fatigue and knee/back pain, 4) unfavorable weather, (e.g., too cold/hot), 5) expense of physical activity programs, and 6) safety concern around the trail. Interestingly, it was noted that weekends led to reduced physical activity as the participants wanted to rest and relax. Perceived health benefits include 1) management of weight and diabetes, 2) improved mental health, and 3) better sleep. Additionally, most participants perceived facilitators included: 1) their physical activity skills, 2) motivation/ self-esteem, 3) a safe environment, and 4) more time. Several unique facilitators were found due to the COVID-19 pandemic positively impacting participants' physical activity level such as peer support (daughter, pet, and co-workers).

Most of the participants reported promoting physical activity among the children they serve.

Conclusion: Childcare providers face complex, multifaceted, and interrelated barriers to physical activity. To overcome these barriers, interventions that teach strategies for overcoming barriers and prioritizing physical activity amidst childcare demands are warranted.