Presentation Title

Victimization on Tribal Lands: An Application of Social Disorganization Theory

Presenter Information

Sheena GilbertFollow

Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/

0000-0001-7376-3533

Advisor Information

Emily M. Wright

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #807 - G

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 12:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 1:15 PM

Abstract

Social disorganization theory has been used to identify neighborhood characteristics (e.g., poverty, ethnic heterogeneity, and residential mobility) that are associated with victimization. There is the question as to whether a traditional western theory can be applied to Native American communities. Native American communities have unique characteristics that separate them from other western societal communities. For instance, Native communities are matriarchal, and colonization is a crucial part of Native American history that creates a framework for understanding how Native Americans live. Additionally, Native communities have high rates of poverty, unemployment, and alcohol abuse. Therefore, because of these unique characteristics, traditional western theory, such as social disorganization theory, might not be generalizable to Native communities. There is some hope that this theory may be applicable due to other research applying social disorganization to rural communities that have similar characteristics to Native American communities. Understanding the degree to which social disorganization theory applies to these communities helps understand why crime occurs in vulnerable areas and can point to ways to better prevent and/or respond to victimization in these areas. To date, however, no research has examined the applicability of social disorganization theory to victimization within Native American communities. Therefore, the following study will use social disorganization theory to examine victimization data and determine if the neighborhood characteristics defined in this theory can be used to explain Native American victimization.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:30 PM Mar 4th, 1:15 PM

Victimization on Tribal Lands: An Application of Social Disorganization Theory

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #807 - G

Social disorganization theory has been used to identify neighborhood characteristics (e.g., poverty, ethnic heterogeneity, and residential mobility) that are associated with victimization. There is the question as to whether a traditional western theory can be applied to Native American communities. Native American communities have unique characteristics that separate them from other western societal communities. For instance, Native communities are matriarchal, and colonization is a crucial part of Native American history that creates a framework for understanding how Native Americans live. Additionally, Native communities have high rates of poverty, unemployment, and alcohol abuse. Therefore, because of these unique characteristics, traditional western theory, such as social disorganization theory, might not be generalizable to Native communities. There is some hope that this theory may be applicable due to other research applying social disorganization to rural communities that have similar characteristics to Native American communities. Understanding the degree to which social disorganization theory applies to these communities helps understand why crime occurs in vulnerable areas and can point to ways to better prevent and/or respond to victimization in these areas. To date, however, no research has examined the applicability of social disorganization theory to victimization within Native American communities. Therefore, the following study will use social disorganization theory to examine victimization data and determine if the neighborhood characteristics defined in this theory can be used to explain Native American victimization.