Presentation Title

The alteration in ground reaction force while walking with assistive tennis shoes in patients with peripheral artery disease

Advisor Information

Sara Myers

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #805 - U

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 12:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 1:45 PM

Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is caused due to buildup of atherosclerotic plaques, typically in the leg arteries, preventing adequate blood circulation and ultimately claudication. A previous study showed that the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) curve is significantly flatter in claudicating patients, resulting in a lower and less fluctuant center of mass when ambulating. Patients with PAD also demonstrate significantly decreased propulsion forces in the anterior– posterior direction. An ankle foot orthosis has recently been implemented in patients with PAD to provide extra assistance during push-off. Compliance to ankle foot orthoses has been poor due to the design barriers. Assistive tennis shoes (carbon fiber: CF, and spring-loaded: SL) can potentially assist push-off by substituting for muscle forces using energy stored in a carbon fiber plate or metal spring within the shoe. This study aims to examine how the CF and SL shoes impact walking performance in patients with PAD. A total of ten patients with PAD performed a progressive treadmill test using a pressure-instrumented treadmill for each shoe type: i) standard shoes, ii) CF shoes, and iii) SL shoes. We will calculate the peak VGRF forces for following three conditions during walking: i) beginning of the trial, ii) onset of claudication pain, iii) before the patient stopped walking due to claudication pain. We hypothesize that patients with PAD would generate greater fluctuation in the VGRF while walking with CF and SL shoes compared to normal shoes. If proven effective, CF and SL shoes may become a new therapeutic intervention for patients with PAD.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:30 PM Mar 4th, 1:45 PM

The alteration in ground reaction force while walking with assistive tennis shoes in patients with peripheral artery disease

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #805 - U

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is caused due to buildup of atherosclerotic plaques, typically in the leg arteries, preventing adequate blood circulation and ultimately claudication. A previous study showed that the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) curve is significantly flatter in claudicating patients, resulting in a lower and less fluctuant center of mass when ambulating. Patients with PAD also demonstrate significantly decreased propulsion forces in the anterior– posterior direction. An ankle foot orthosis has recently been implemented in patients with PAD to provide extra assistance during push-off. Compliance to ankle foot orthoses has been poor due to the design barriers. Assistive tennis shoes (carbon fiber: CF, and spring-loaded: SL) can potentially assist push-off by substituting for muscle forces using energy stored in a carbon fiber plate or metal spring within the shoe. This study aims to examine how the CF and SL shoes impact walking performance in patients with PAD. A total of ten patients with PAD performed a progressive treadmill test using a pressure-instrumented treadmill for each shoe type: i) standard shoes, ii) CF shoes, and iii) SL shoes. We will calculate the peak VGRF forces for following three conditions during walking: i) beginning of the trial, ii) onset of claudication pain, iii) before the patient stopped walking due to claudication pain. We hypothesize that patients with PAD would generate greater fluctuation in the VGRF while walking with CF and SL shoes compared to normal shoes. If proven effective, CF and SL shoes may become a new therapeutic intervention for patients with PAD.