Presentation Title

The Effects of Swing Speed on the Variability of Ball Contact and Risk of Lower Back Injury in Golfers

Presenter Information

Luke PartuschFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Brian Knarr

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #403 - U

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 2:00 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 3:15 PM

Abstract

Many golfers increase their swing speed in order to increase the distance of their shots, which often leads to poor ball contact and increased stress in the lower back. These are contradictory to the golfer’s intent and problematic for golfers who are trying to increase their performance and stay healthy. Therefore, the goals of this study are to determine the effect of swing speed on ball contact for golfers to increase their performance, as well as to determine effect of swing speed on low back stress to keep golfers healthy.

In this study, subjects are instructed to hit golf balls into a net. Each subject takes swings with a pitching wedge, 7-iron, and driver, while being given cues to create two conditions: decreased club head speed and increased club head speed.

Adhesive reflective markers are attached to the clubs and to biomechanically significant locations of the subject to build a biomechanical model for analyzing swinging movements. 3D analysis is performed by Qualisys motion capture (Qualisys, Gothenburg, Sweden). The subjects stand on embedded force plates (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA). Data was analyzed using Visual 3D (C-Motion, Inc., Rockville, MD).

Club speed and ball speed were quantified using FlightScope data to determine Smash Factor, which is a ratio used to determine quality of impact with the golf ball. Spinal torsion was quantified using Visual 3D to estimate spinal torsion. Repeated measures t tests were used to compare Smash Factor and spinal torsion between slower and faster swings.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 2:00 PM Mar 4th, 3:15 PM

The Effects of Swing Speed on the Variability of Ball Contact and Risk of Lower Back Injury in Golfers

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #403 - U

Many golfers increase their swing speed in order to increase the distance of their shots, which often leads to poor ball contact and increased stress in the lower back. These are contradictory to the golfer’s intent and problematic for golfers who are trying to increase their performance and stay healthy. Therefore, the goals of this study are to determine the effect of swing speed on ball contact for golfers to increase their performance, as well as to determine effect of swing speed on low back stress to keep golfers healthy.

In this study, subjects are instructed to hit golf balls into a net. Each subject takes swings with a pitching wedge, 7-iron, and driver, while being given cues to create two conditions: decreased club head speed and increased club head speed.

Adhesive reflective markers are attached to the clubs and to biomechanically significant locations of the subject to build a biomechanical model for analyzing swinging movements. 3D analysis is performed by Qualisys motion capture (Qualisys, Gothenburg, Sweden). The subjects stand on embedded force plates (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA). Data was analyzed using Visual 3D (C-Motion, Inc., Rockville, MD).

Club speed and ball speed were quantified using FlightScope data to determine Smash Factor, which is a ratio used to determine quality of impact with the golf ball. Spinal torsion was quantified using Visual 3D to estimate spinal torsion. Repeated measures t tests were used to compare Smash Factor and spinal torsion between slower and faster swings.