Healthcare Provider's Perception on Infant Physical Activity, Strength, and Communication

Author #1

Abstract

Background: Healthcare providers (HPs), as trusted entities, play a critical role in disseminating information about infant health and development. Two key developmental areas for infants are movement (physical activity, strength) and communication. However, little research has explored HPs' perceptions of infants' physical activity (PA), strength, and communication. As a result, it is necessary to explore whether and where HP may require support to promote these key development outcomes in infants at an early age.

Purpose: To qualitatively explore HPs perception of infant physical activity, strength, and communication.

Method: A total of 13 diverse HP’s were recruited, including a physician, advanced practice provider, chiropractor, occupational therapist, speech-language pathologist, and physical therapist. Semi-structured interviews were conducted via Zoom based on the Health Belief Model. Inductive content analysis was used to analyze data.

Result: Regarding PA and strength, HP had limited knowledge about the recommended movement guidelines. HP's said they had experienced concerns about an infants' PA, primarily related to an infant being too sedentary due to restricted playtime as well as infants neck strength (not elevating the head), lack of tummy time, and not reacting to stimulation. Most HP's said they counseled parents about PA and motor development milestones, with the most frequently asked questions from parents being related to crawling, walking, and tummy time. Moreover, HP's were interested in learning about tools to measure PA. Barriers identified for PA promotion were parent's busy work schedules and not speaking the same language as the parents. In terms of communication, most HPs counseled parents on verbal and nonverbal communication, with the most prevalent concerns noted in not reacting to stimuli and parent communication misconceptions. The majority of HPs were unaware of or had minimal understanding of assessing communication and were interested in knowing more about these tools. When questioned, Most HPs stated they thought infant PA, strength, and communication were linked.

Conclusion: HPs had limited knowledge about the PA guidelines as well as awareness of ways to measure PA and communication. Importantly, they were interested in learning more about these topics. Efforts are needed to identify easily accessible ways to educate HPs that could also be disseminated to parents.

 
Mar 4th, 9:00 AM Mar 4th, 10:15 AM

Healthcare Provider's Perception on Infant Physical Activity, Strength, and Communication

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #506 - G

Background: Healthcare providers (HPs), as trusted entities, play a critical role in disseminating information about infant health and development. Two key developmental areas for infants are movement (physical activity, strength) and communication. However, little research has explored HPs' perceptions of infants' physical activity (PA), strength, and communication. As a result, it is necessary to explore whether and where HP may require support to promote these key development outcomes in infants at an early age.

Purpose: To qualitatively explore HPs perception of infant physical activity, strength, and communication.

Method: A total of 13 diverse HP’s were recruited, including a physician, advanced practice provider, chiropractor, occupational therapist, speech-language pathologist, and physical therapist. Semi-structured interviews were conducted via Zoom based on the Health Belief Model. Inductive content analysis was used to analyze data.

Result: Regarding PA and strength, HP had limited knowledge about the recommended movement guidelines. HP's said they had experienced concerns about an infants' PA, primarily related to an infant being too sedentary due to restricted playtime as well as infants neck strength (not elevating the head), lack of tummy time, and not reacting to stimulation. Most HP's said they counseled parents about PA and motor development milestones, with the most frequently asked questions from parents being related to crawling, walking, and tummy time. Moreover, HP's were interested in learning about tools to measure PA. Barriers identified for PA promotion were parent's busy work schedules and not speaking the same language as the parents. In terms of communication, most HPs counseled parents on verbal and nonverbal communication, with the most prevalent concerns noted in not reacting to stimuli and parent communication misconceptions. The majority of HPs were unaware of or had minimal understanding of assessing communication and were interested in knowing more about these tools. When questioned, Most HPs stated they thought infant PA, strength, and communication were linked.

Conclusion: HPs had limited knowledge about the PA guidelines as well as awareness of ways to measure PA and communication. Importantly, they were interested in learning more about these topics. Efforts are needed to identify easily accessible ways to educate HPs that could also be disseminated to parents.