Presentation Title

Genetic structure of 'Alliaria petiolata' populations along the invasion front in North America

Advisor Information

Dr. Roxi Kellar

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #303 - G

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 12:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 1:45 PM

Abstract

Invasive species are known to alter native, natural communities and the ecology of the landscape where they become established due to alterations to hydrology, nutrient cycling, energy budgets, and fire regimes. Alliaria petiolata, commonly known as garlic mustard, is an example of an invasive species that is having detrimental effects in North America. Garlic mustard has spread to at least 34 states and some Canadian provinces. The genetic structure of A. petiolata has not been characterized in North America. I investigated 14 established populations along the invasion front that runs from Kansas to Minnesota. Using state-of-the-art genomic sequencing techniques, a detailed view of the evolutionary history of establishment and population can be seen. This information can be used to reveal the genetics underlying successful invasions.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Mar 4th, 12:30 PM Mar 4th, 1:45 PM

Genetic structure of 'Alliaria petiolata' populations along the invasion front in North America

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #303 - G

Invasive species are known to alter native, natural communities and the ecology of the landscape where they become established due to alterations to hydrology, nutrient cycling, energy budgets, and fire regimes. Alliaria petiolata, commonly known as garlic mustard, is an example of an invasive species that is having detrimental effects in North America. Garlic mustard has spread to at least 34 states and some Canadian provinces. The genetic structure of A. petiolata has not been characterized in North America. I investigated 14 established populations along the invasion front that runs from Kansas to Minnesota. Using state-of-the-art genomic sequencing techniques, a detailed view of the evolutionary history of establishment and population can be seen. This information can be used to reveal the genetics underlying successful invasions.