Presentation Title

The effects of cane support on frontal plane hip kinetics and kinematics in chronic stroke gait

Advisor Information

Dr. Brian Knarr

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #709 - G

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 2:00 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 3:15 PM

Abstract

Stroke is a leading cause of long-term adult disability in the United States, and survivors often have significant gait impairments. One common component of these impairments is compromised mediolateral stability in stance. Cane use has been shown to improve mediolateral stability and alter gait biomechanics. However, the frontal plane biomechanical changes associated with assistive device use during overground walking are inadequately understood. Understanding the underlying biomechanical mechanisms of stance phase pelvic stability can provide specific insight into walking performance and guidance for clinical practice. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cane use on the frontal plane hip angles and moments throughout stance in individuals post-stroke during overground walking. Sixteen chronic stroke participants from an ongoing study completed overground walking using no cane, self-selected cane use, and light cane use (

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Mar 4th, 2:00 PM Mar 4th, 3:15 PM

The effects of cane support on frontal plane hip kinetics and kinematics in chronic stroke gait

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #709 - G

Stroke is a leading cause of long-term adult disability in the United States, and survivors often have significant gait impairments. One common component of these impairments is compromised mediolateral stability in stance. Cane use has been shown to improve mediolateral stability and alter gait biomechanics. However, the frontal plane biomechanical changes associated with assistive device use during overground walking are inadequately understood. Understanding the underlying biomechanical mechanisms of stance phase pelvic stability can provide specific insight into walking performance and guidance for clinical practice. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of cane use on the frontal plane hip angles and moments throughout stance in individuals post-stroke during overground walking. Sixteen chronic stroke participants from an ongoing study completed overground walking using no cane, self-selected cane use, and light cane use (