Presentation Title

Comparison of Plantar Force and Ankle Range of Motion during Walking Aid Use in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Presenter Information

Jose Anguiano-HernandezFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. David Kingston

Location

MBSC Dodge Room 302B - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 12:30 PM

End Date

4-3-2022 1:45 PM

Abstract

Offloading diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) via walking aids is typically prescribed to diabetes patients. Walking aids include crutches, walker, and wheeled knee walkers (WKW). The WKW is different in that you can load bodyweight (BW) onto the device through a knee cushion instead of your hands. Regardless, these aids leave one foot to absorb forces on its own. It has been shown that the WKW reduced the amount of force exerted on the bottom of the foot more than crutches, walkers, and normal walking in healthy older adults, but has not been evaluated in diabetes patients. It is also unknown how much BW users are able to load onto each device. Changes to ankle joint range of motion (ROM) could also occur since diabetes patients have been found to have stiffer ankle joints than healthy persons. If the WKW reduces the amount of force on the bottom of the foot more than crutches and walkers, it is reasonable to believe that the ankle joint would have the lowest ROM when walking with the WKW. The purpose of this study is to evaluate changes in forces on the foot and ankle ROM when using different walking aids in diabetes patients. We hypothesize that the WKW will produce the least amount of force on the foot due to greater BW loading onto the walking aid. We also hypothesize that ankle ROM will be lowest using the WKW because of reduced forces on the foot. Preliminary results partially support these hypotheses.

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Mar 4th, 12:30 PM Mar 4th, 1:45 PM

Comparison of Plantar Force and Ankle Range of Motion during Walking Aid Use in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

MBSC Dodge Room 302B - G

Offloading diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) via walking aids is typically prescribed to diabetes patients. Walking aids include crutches, walker, and wheeled knee walkers (WKW). The WKW is different in that you can load bodyweight (BW) onto the device through a knee cushion instead of your hands. Regardless, these aids leave one foot to absorb forces on its own. It has been shown that the WKW reduced the amount of force exerted on the bottom of the foot more than crutches, walkers, and normal walking in healthy older adults, but has not been evaluated in diabetes patients. It is also unknown how much BW users are able to load onto each device. Changes to ankle joint range of motion (ROM) could also occur since diabetes patients have been found to have stiffer ankle joints than healthy persons. If the WKW reduces the amount of force on the bottom of the foot more than crutches and walkers, it is reasonable to believe that the ankle joint would have the lowest ROM when walking with the WKW. The purpose of this study is to evaluate changes in forces on the foot and ankle ROM when using different walking aids in diabetes patients. We hypothesize that the WKW will produce the least amount of force on the foot due to greater BW loading onto the walking aid. We also hypothesize that ankle ROM will be lowest using the WKW because of reduced forces on the foot. Preliminary results partially support these hypotheses.