Presentation Title

Quantifying the Impact of Smartphone Presence and Notifications on Attention and Task Performance

Author ORCID Identifier

0000-0001-7457-9148

Advisor Information

Dr. Brian Dorn

Location

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 12:00 PM

Abstract

Findings from previous research report a negative impact of smartphone distractions and interruptions on human cognition. Some of these studies provided contradicting results. This study aimed to address the limitations of previous studies and quantified the impact of smartphone distractions and interruptions on sustained attention in a within-subjects lab experiment. The study utilized an attention-demanding task to examine sustained attention among 66 university students as participants received interventions in the form of smartphone distractions and interruptions, while completing the tasks. The findings indicate that while there was no significant difference in participants' attention and performance across all experiment sessions, the number of times the participants looked at their phones and someone else's phone were significantly different. In contrast to prior research, it seems that even though the number of phone looks between a participant's own phone and somebody else's phone could be different, it did not have a significant impact on their attention. This can be described through the lens of attachment theory, as even though the level of dependence differs among users, smartphones do not significantly interfere with or impact their attention.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:00 PM

Quantifying the Impact of Smartphone Presence and Notifications on Attention and Task Performance

MBSC Dodge Room 302A - G

Findings from previous research report a negative impact of smartphone distractions and interruptions on human cognition. Some of these studies provided contradicting results. This study aimed to address the limitations of previous studies and quantified the impact of smartphone distractions and interruptions on sustained attention in a within-subjects lab experiment. The study utilized an attention-demanding task to examine sustained attention among 66 university students as participants received interventions in the form of smartphone distractions and interruptions, while completing the tasks. The findings indicate that while there was no significant difference in participants' attention and performance across all experiment sessions, the number of times the participants looked at their phones and someone else's phone were significantly different. In contrast to prior research, it seems that even though the number of phone looks between a participant's own phone and somebody else's phone could be different, it did not have a significant impact on their attention. This can be described through the lens of attachment theory, as even though the level of dependence differs among users, smartphones do not significantly interfere with or impact their attention.