Presentation Title

Effect of Stent Design on Intramural Stresses of the Femoropopliteal Artery

Author ORCID Identifier

0000-0001-8778-4319

Advisor Information

Anastasia Desyatova

Location

MBSC Gallery Room 308 - G

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-3-2022 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 12:00 PM

Abstract

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA) often manifests itself as an atherosclerotic lesion that limits blood flow to the lower extremities. Angioplasty with stent placement is one of the commonly used ways to treat PAD. However, hemodynamically significant restenosis 2-3 years after stenting is typical in 20-45% of the patients and re-intervention is often required in these cases. The systemic risk factors of the restenosis are the same for carotid, renal, iliac and FPA reconstructions, however the failure rate is highest for the FPA interventions. One of the reasons can be severe mechanical deformations of the FPA during limb flexion. Currently available stents are not able to accommodate these severe deformations which can contribute to the arterial injury and lead to restenosis and reconstruction failure. The goal of the current project was to determine stent characteristics that are beneficial in accommodation of the FPA severe deformations. We developed a computational model of the stented FPA segment subjected to physiological deformations. We then utilized a Design of Experiments approach to investigate the effect of five stent parameters on principal intramural stresses and strains, stent-artery wall apposition, and lumen opening. We found that increase in stent width and thickness leads to the increased arterial stresses, stent-wall apposition and lumen opening, while increase in strut amplitude leads to decreased stresses and apposition. Using Design of Experiments in computational modeling of stented FPA deformations can be instrumental in designing novel stents capable to withstand mechanical environment of the FPA.

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COinS
 
Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:00 PM

Effect of Stent Design on Intramural Stresses of the Femoropopliteal Artery

MBSC Gallery Room 308 - G

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA) often manifests itself as an atherosclerotic lesion that limits blood flow to the lower extremities. Angioplasty with stent placement is one of the commonly used ways to treat PAD. However, hemodynamically significant restenosis 2-3 years after stenting is typical in 20-45% of the patients and re-intervention is often required in these cases. The systemic risk factors of the restenosis are the same for carotid, renal, iliac and FPA reconstructions, however the failure rate is highest for the FPA interventions. One of the reasons can be severe mechanical deformations of the FPA during limb flexion. Currently available stents are not able to accommodate these severe deformations which can contribute to the arterial injury and lead to restenosis and reconstruction failure. The goal of the current project was to determine stent characteristics that are beneficial in accommodation of the FPA severe deformations. We developed a computational model of the stented FPA segment subjected to physiological deformations. We then utilized a Design of Experiments approach to investigate the effect of five stent parameters on principal intramural stresses and strains, stent-artery wall apposition, and lumen opening. We found that increase in stent width and thickness leads to the increased arterial stresses, stent-wall apposition and lumen opening, while increase in strut amplitude leads to decreased stresses and apposition. Using Design of Experiments in computational modeling of stented FPA deformations can be instrumental in designing novel stents capable to withstand mechanical environment of the FPA.