Presentation Title

Ipsilateral motor control of prosthesis during first use

Presenter Type

UNO Graduate Student (Doctoral)

Major/Field of Study

Biomechanics

Author ORCID Identifier

0000-0002-7605-5126

Advisor Information

Jorge M. Zuniga

Location

MBSC306 - G (Doctoral)

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

24-3-2023 9:00 AM

End Date

24-3-2023 10:15 AM

Abstract

To better understand the neurological mechanisms associated with prosthetic usage, a study was conducted during an initial fitting for children with congenital upper limb reductions body powered prosthetics. The aim of the current study was to examine the differences between hemispheric dominance at specific regions of interest between the affected and non-affected hands. fNIRS activity was recorded (NIRSport 2, NIRx Medical Technologies, Berlin, Germany) over 20 channels in regions associated with motor control and motor planning in the frontal and parietal lobes (specifically the premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, and primary sensory cortex). The hemodynamic activity was recorded for 9 participants (11±3.9 years old, 4 female, right-hand affected) during three one-minute-long gross motor dexterity tasks completed with a non-affected hand and an affected (prosthetic) hand. The hemodynamic activity for the first ten seconds of the task was block averaged in Homer3 before laterality index calculation and graphing were conducted in Matlab (The Mathworks Inc, Natick, MA, USA). The participants moved more blocks with their non-affected hands regardless of side (left non-affected: 43.52 ± 16.04, right non-affected: 34.76 ± 16.43 blocks) than with their affected hands (right affected: 7.33 ± 3.18, left affected 7.0 ± 5.32 blocks) (p = 0.001). During the time that the participants were completing the tasks, usage of the non-affected hand was associated with contralateral control in each region of interest. However, during usage of the affected hand with a prosthesis, the participants displayed ipsilateral control in all regions of interest but the premotor cortex. The main findings of this study include ipsilateral dominance of the primary motor and sensory cortices during control of an affected hand while wearing a prosthesis. This ipsilateral dominance in this group supports previous case study findings where a participant’s initial ipsilateral dominance was reversed through training. Accordingly, hemispheric laterality should be further studied to determine whether neuroplastic changes are associated with better functionality or perceived comfort. These insights might be used when determining dosage of prosthesis training in children.

Scheduling

9:15-10:30 a.m., 10:45 a.m.-Noon, 1-2:15 p.m.

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Mar 24th, 9:00 AM Mar 24th, 10:15 AM

Ipsilateral motor control of prosthesis during first use

MBSC306 - G (Doctoral)

To better understand the neurological mechanisms associated with prosthetic usage, a study was conducted during an initial fitting for children with congenital upper limb reductions body powered prosthetics. The aim of the current study was to examine the differences between hemispheric dominance at specific regions of interest between the affected and non-affected hands. fNIRS activity was recorded (NIRSport 2, NIRx Medical Technologies, Berlin, Germany) over 20 channels in regions associated with motor control and motor planning in the frontal and parietal lobes (specifically the premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, and primary sensory cortex). The hemodynamic activity was recorded for 9 participants (11±3.9 years old, 4 female, right-hand affected) during three one-minute-long gross motor dexterity tasks completed with a non-affected hand and an affected (prosthetic) hand. The hemodynamic activity for the first ten seconds of the task was block averaged in Homer3 before laterality index calculation and graphing were conducted in Matlab (The Mathworks Inc, Natick, MA, USA). The participants moved more blocks with their non-affected hands regardless of side (left non-affected: 43.52 ± 16.04, right non-affected: 34.76 ± 16.43 blocks) than with their affected hands (right affected: 7.33 ± 3.18, left affected 7.0 ± 5.32 blocks) (p = 0.001). During the time that the participants were completing the tasks, usage of the non-affected hand was associated with contralateral control in each region of interest. However, during usage of the affected hand with a prosthesis, the participants displayed ipsilateral control in all regions of interest but the premotor cortex. The main findings of this study include ipsilateral dominance of the primary motor and sensory cortices during control of an affected hand while wearing a prosthesis. This ipsilateral dominance in this group supports previous case study findings where a participant’s initial ipsilateral dominance was reversed through training. Accordingly, hemispheric laterality should be further studied to determine whether neuroplastic changes are associated with better functionality or perceived comfort. These insights might be used when determining dosage of prosthesis training in children.