Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-2020

Publication Title

Computers & Security

Volume

99

First Page

1

Last Page

13

Abstract

The technical protection provided by information security technology is necessary as a frontline defense against threats. However, the human element adds great risk to systems and cannot be ignored. This research explores the human elements related to security communications and intention to comply with security directives. Security communications are more-commonly being sent using richer computer-based channels. While the goal of security communications is the gain compliance, there is still much to learn related to what influences a user to comply. This research explores the effects that (im)politeness has on intention to comply with security directives. The research utilized an experiment that focused on secure browser setting directives using several types of online communication. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive communications/directives that were text-based, text/image-based, or video-based. The communications were also grouped into polite and impolite messaging. The results for the overall model indicated perceived richness had a negative influence on perceived mental workload. Additionally, perceived mental workload resulted in a decreased intention to comply with security directives. There were no significant differences between polite and impolite groups for the treatment groups with text-based and text/image-based messaging. However, in the video-based treatment, the relationship between perceived richness and intention to comply with security directives was significantly different between the polite and impolite groups.

Comments

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Elsevier in Science Direct on December 2020, available online: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cose.2020.102007

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Available for download on Saturday, December 31, 2022

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