Presentation Title

Individualized Social Skills Interventions for Young Adults

Advisor Information

Brian McKevitt

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-3-2014 1:00 PM

End Date

7-3-2014 4:00 PM

Abstract

As the number of individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) continuing their education in postsecondary settings continues to increase, it is essential to address the needs of these individuals. Young adults with AS can have difficulty navigating the social world during this transition time in their lives. Research on social skills programs for young adults with AS is limited and the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of individualized social skills interventions as a method for increasing specific social skills. This study utilized a case study approach with four young adults with AS such that each young adult was given a social skills goal based on their needs. Results found an increase in the targeted social skills when measured by direct observation. How this study contributes to the existing body of literature, practical implications, and concerns with self-perceived social competency are also presented.

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Mar 7th, 1:00 PM Mar 7th, 4:00 PM

Individualized Social Skills Interventions for Young Adults

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

As the number of individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome (AS) continuing their education in postsecondary settings continues to increase, it is essential to address the needs of these individuals. Young adults with AS can have difficulty navigating the social world during this transition time in their lives. Research on social skills programs for young adults with AS is limited and the purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of individualized social skills interventions as a method for increasing specific social skills. This study utilized a case study approach with four young adults with AS such that each young adult was given a social skills goal based on their needs. Results found an increase in the targeted social skills when measured by direct observation. How this study contributes to the existing body of literature, practical implications, and concerns with self-perceived social competency are also presented.