Presentation Title

The Effect of Mechanism to Achieve Hypoxic Load on the Exercise Response

Presenter Information

Christina AngeliFollow

Advisor Information

Dr. Dustin Slivka

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

2-3-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

2-3-2018 3:30 PM

Abstract

There has been recent debate on the difference of physiological response between exposure to simulated altitude (normobaric hypoxia) and terrestrial altitude (hypobaric hypoxia). Purpose: To determine whether the mechanism to achieve hypoxia results in physiological differences during exercise. Methods: Eight recreationally active subjects (27 ± 5 y, body mass of 73.1 ± 7.4 kg, 170.6 ± 6.7 cm, 19.3 ± 9.2 %) completed incremental exercise trials to volitional fatigue on a cycle ergometer in three separate conditions, normobaric normoxia (NN; 350 m), normobaric hypoxia (NH; 3100 m) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH; 3094 m). Heart rate, blood and tissue oxygenation, muscle electrical activity, and metabolic gases were measured at rest and continuously throughout the exercise trials. Results: Blood oxygenation was higher in NN compared to the two hypoxic conditions (p < 0.001) at rest and all exercise stages, with no difference between NH and HH (p > 0.05). Blood oxygenation decreased significantly from rest to 130 W and 165 W in the NH and HH conditions (p < 0.05), but this decrease was not seen in the NN condition (p > 0.05). Heart rate and tissue oxygenation were higher in HH compared to NN and NH (p < 0.05), whereas absolute VO2 was lower in NH compared to NN and HH (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Terrestrial altitude may seem to be a more severe environment, but simulated altitude produces similar physiological responses during incremental cycle exercise.

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COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 2:15 PM Mar 2nd, 3:30 PM

The Effect of Mechanism to Achieve Hypoxic Load on the Exercise Response

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

There has been recent debate on the difference of physiological response between exposure to simulated altitude (normobaric hypoxia) and terrestrial altitude (hypobaric hypoxia). Purpose: To determine whether the mechanism to achieve hypoxia results in physiological differences during exercise. Methods: Eight recreationally active subjects (27 ± 5 y, body mass of 73.1 ± 7.4 kg, 170.6 ± 6.7 cm, 19.3 ± 9.2 %) completed incremental exercise trials to volitional fatigue on a cycle ergometer in three separate conditions, normobaric normoxia (NN; 350 m), normobaric hypoxia (NH; 3100 m) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH; 3094 m). Heart rate, blood and tissue oxygenation, muscle electrical activity, and metabolic gases were measured at rest and continuously throughout the exercise trials. Results: Blood oxygenation was higher in NN compared to the two hypoxic conditions (p < 0.001) at rest and all exercise stages, with no difference between NH and HH (p > 0.05). Blood oxygenation decreased significantly from rest to 130 W and 165 W in the NH and HH conditions (p < 0.05), but this decrease was not seen in the NN condition (p > 0.05). Heart rate and tissue oxygenation were higher in HH compared to NN and NH (p < 0.05), whereas absolute VO2 was lower in NH compared to NN and HH (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Terrestrial altitude may seem to be a more severe environment, but simulated altitude produces similar physiological responses during incremental cycle exercise.