Presentation Title

Acute Effects of Functional Dry Needling on Skeletal Muscle Function

Presenter Information

Austin MeadFollow

Advisor Information

Dustin Slivka

Location

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

2-3-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

2-3-2018 10:15 AM

Abstract

ACUTE EFFECTS OF FUNCTIONAL DRY NEEDLING ON SKELETAL MUSCLE FUNCTION

Introduction: Functional Dry Needling (FDN) is a treatment modality utilized by physical therapists (PT) to help treat a variety of conditions including but not limited to myofascial pain syndrome, and low back pain. FDN has been shown to reduce pain, and to increase the range of motion of joints. However, there is a lack of physiological measures concerning FDN’s effect on skeletal muscle. Methods: Subjects were tested on an isokinetic dynamometer for strength, fatigability, and range of motion. EMG and muscle oxygen saturation were measured during testing on the isokinetic dynamometer. FDN of the vastus lateralis was performed using a pistoning action to produce a muscle twitch, this was continued until the PT could not produce a muscle twitch. The subject was allowed to lay prone for 3-5 minutes post-needling before post-testing. Post-testing will then be performed identically to the initial testing. Implications: This study aims to examine the physiologic response to FDN in healthy individuals, which may be different than previously studied clinical populations. Also, in studying a healthy population we can help establish normative data.

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COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 9:00 AM Mar 2nd, 10:15 AM

Acute Effects of Functional Dry Needling on Skeletal Muscle Function

Dr. C.C. and Mabel L. Criss Library

ACUTE EFFECTS OF FUNCTIONAL DRY NEEDLING ON SKELETAL MUSCLE FUNCTION

Introduction: Functional Dry Needling (FDN) is a treatment modality utilized by physical therapists (PT) to help treat a variety of conditions including but not limited to myofascial pain syndrome, and low back pain. FDN has been shown to reduce pain, and to increase the range of motion of joints. However, there is a lack of physiological measures concerning FDN’s effect on skeletal muscle. Methods: Subjects were tested on an isokinetic dynamometer for strength, fatigability, and range of motion. EMG and muscle oxygen saturation were measured during testing on the isokinetic dynamometer. FDN of the vastus lateralis was performed using a pistoning action to produce a muscle twitch, this was continued until the PT could not produce a muscle twitch. The subject was allowed to lay prone for 3-5 minutes post-needling before post-testing. Post-testing will then be performed identically to the initial testing. Implications: This study aims to examine the physiologic response to FDN in healthy individuals, which may be different than previously studied clinical populations. Also, in studying a healthy population we can help establish normative data.