Presenter Information

Sriram SrinivasanFollow

Advisor Information

Sanjukta Bhowmick

Location

231

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

1-3-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

1-3-2019 10:15 AM

Abstract

In the last decade growth of social media, increased the interest of network algorithms for analyzing large-scale complex systems. The networks are highly unstructured and exhibit poor locality, which has been a challenge for developing scalable parallel algorithms. The state-of-the-art network algorithms such as Prim's algorithm for Minimum Spanning Tree, Dijkstra's algorithm for Single Source Shortest Path and ISPAN algorithm for detecting strongly connected components are designed and optimized for static networks. The networks which change with time i.e. the dynamic networks such as social networks, the above-mentioned approaches can only be utilized if they are recomputed from scratch each time. Performing a re-computation from scratch for a significant amount of changes is not only computationally expensive, however, increases the memory footprint and the execution time. In the case of dynamic networks, developing scalable parallel algorithms is very challenging and there has been a very limited amount of research work that has been performed when compared to developing parallel scalable algorithms for static networks.

To address the above challenges, this presentation proposes a new high performance, scalable, portable, open source software package and an efficient network data structure to update the dynamic networks on the fly. This approach is different from the naive approach which is the re-computation from scratch and is scalable for random, small-world, scale-free, real-world and synthetic networks. The software package currently is implemented on a shared memory system and updates network properties such as Connected Components (CC), Minimum Spanning Tree (MST), Single Source Shortest Path (SSSP), and Strongly Connected Components(SCC). The key attributes of software are faster insertions, and deletions when Comparing the software with the state-of-the-art network algorithms package such as Galois for MST takes less time and memory for updating the network. The shared memory implementation processes over 50 million updates on a real-world network under 30 seconds. The dissertation concludes with a summarization of the contributions and their improvement on large-scale network analytics and a discussion about future work on this field.

COinS
 
Mar 1st, 9:00 AM Mar 1st, 10:15 AM

A shared-memory algorithm for updating single-source shortest paths in large weighted dynamic networks

231

In the last decade growth of social media, increased the interest of network algorithms for analyzing large-scale complex systems. The networks are highly unstructured and exhibit poor locality, which has been a challenge for developing scalable parallel algorithms. The state-of-the-art network algorithms such as Prim's algorithm for Minimum Spanning Tree, Dijkstra's algorithm for Single Source Shortest Path and ISPAN algorithm for detecting strongly connected components are designed and optimized for static networks. The networks which change with time i.e. the dynamic networks such as social networks, the above-mentioned approaches can only be utilized if they are recomputed from scratch each time. Performing a re-computation from scratch for a significant amount of changes is not only computationally expensive, however, increases the memory footprint and the execution time. In the case of dynamic networks, developing scalable parallel algorithms is very challenging and there has been a very limited amount of research work that has been performed when compared to developing parallel scalable algorithms for static networks.

To address the above challenges, this presentation proposes a new high performance, scalable, portable, open source software package and an efficient network data structure to update the dynamic networks on the fly. This approach is different from the naive approach which is the re-computation from scratch and is scalable for random, small-world, scale-free, real-world and synthetic networks. The software package currently is implemented on a shared memory system and updates network properties such as Connected Components (CC), Minimum Spanning Tree (MST), Single Source Shortest Path (SSSP), and Strongly Connected Components(SCC). The key attributes of software are faster insertions, and deletions when Comparing the software with the state-of-the-art network algorithms package such as Galois for MST takes less time and memory for updating the network. The shared memory implementation processes over 50 million updates on a real-world network under 30 seconds. The dissertation concludes with a summarization of the contributions and their improvement on large-scale network analytics and a discussion about future work on this field.