Presentation Title

Low-Cost Asymmetric Hip Brace for Error Augmentation Training

Presenter Information

Kayla KowalczykFollow

Advisor Information

Philippe Malcolm

Location

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #906 - G

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

4-3-2022 10:45 AM

End Date

4-3-2022 12:00 PM

Abstract

Nearly 200 million Americans suffer from at least one neurological condition (i.e., stroke or Multiple Sclerosis) that may affect their ability to perform daily activities, such as walking. Termed asymmetric walking gait, typical detriments include altered step lengths and stance and swing durations that increase the energy needed to walk. Previously, split-belt (i.e., a belt for each leg moving at different speeds) error augmentation (i.e., increasing deviations of step length) raining has been used to produce more symmetric walking patterns in the affected populations. However, this therapy requires large power source and costs thousands of dollars. More portable, long-term interventions are needed to make rehabilitation more accessible. We developed a one-side hip brace that has bands attaching to the thigh on the back of the body. We had three groups of five people complete a data collection either walking on the split-belt treadmill with the belts at different speeds, walking with the hip brace on with the belts at the same speed, or walking with the hip brace and the belts at different speeds. All the groups initially completed a baseline walking trial. Upon completion of the experimental trials, participants completed a twenty-minute walking trial with the belts at the same speed. Data analysis found that wearing the hip brace while walking on belts at different speeds helped participants maintain symmetric step lengths once the belts were at the same speed and the brace was removed. These results illustrate the potential of a passive device to impact asymmetric walking gait.

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Mar 4th, 10:45 AM Mar 4th, 12:00 PM

Low-Cost Asymmetric Hip Brace for Error Augmentation Training

MBSC Ballroom - Poster #906 - G

Nearly 200 million Americans suffer from at least one neurological condition (i.e., stroke or Multiple Sclerosis) that may affect their ability to perform daily activities, such as walking. Termed asymmetric walking gait, typical detriments include altered step lengths and stance and swing durations that increase the energy needed to walk. Previously, split-belt (i.e., a belt for each leg moving at different speeds) error augmentation (i.e., increasing deviations of step length) raining has been used to produce more symmetric walking patterns in the affected populations. However, this therapy requires large power source and costs thousands of dollars. More portable, long-term interventions are needed to make rehabilitation more accessible. We developed a one-side hip brace that has bands attaching to the thigh on the back of the body. We had three groups of five people complete a data collection either walking on the split-belt treadmill with the belts at different speeds, walking with the hip brace on with the belts at the same speed, or walking with the hip brace and the belts at different speeds. All the groups initially completed a baseline walking trial. Upon completion of the experimental trials, participants completed a twenty-minute walking trial with the belts at the same speed. Data analysis found that wearing the hip brace while walking on belts at different speeds helped participants maintain symmetric step lengths once the belts were at the same speed and the brace was removed. These results illustrate the potential of a passive device to impact asymmetric walking gait.